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15 houseplants for improving indoor air quality - Weeping fig

A ficus in your living room can help filter out pollutants that typically accompany carpeting and furniture such as formaldehyde, benzene and trichloroethylene. Caring for a ficus can be tricky, but once you get the watering and light conditions right, they will last a long time.
Joshua Ginnever
Joshua Ginnever • 2 years ago

Weeping Fig (Ficus benjamina)

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Garden and Farms: 10 Houseplants That Clean Indoor Air

Houseplant for improving indoor air quality. Chinese evergreen (Aglaonema Crispum 'Deborah'). This easy-to-care-for plant can help filter out a variety of air pollutants and begins to remove more toxins as time and exposure continues. Even with low light, it will produce blooms and red berries. From mnn.com

15 houseplants for improving indoor air quality: Bamboo palm (Chamaedorea sefritzii) Also known as the reed palm, this small palm thrives in shady indoor spaces and often produces flowers and small berries. It tops the list of plants best for filtering out both benzene and trichloroethylene. They’re also a good choice for placing around furniture that could be off-gassing formaldehyde.

Gerber Daisy - This bright, flowering plant is effective at removing trichloroethylene, which you may bring home with your dry cleaning. It’s also good for filtering out the benzene that comes with inks. Add one to your laundry room or bedroom — presuming you can give it lots of light.

Crysanthemum - The colorful flowers of a mum can do a lot more than brighten a home office or living room; the blooms also help filter out benzene, which is commonly found in glue, paint, plastics and detergent. This plant loves bright light, and to encourage buds to open, you’ll need to find a spot near an open window with direct sunlight

English ivy (Hedera helix) A study found that the plant reduces airborne fecal-matter particles. It has also been shown to filter out formaldehyde found in some household cleaning products.

Hug Your Ficus: It's National Indoor Plant Week!

No time to take care of a plant? Try Chinese evergreen. Care tips from Southern Living

Warneck dracaena (Dracaena deremensis 'Warneckii'): Combat pollutants associated with varnishes and oils with this dracaena. The Warneckii grows inside easily, even without direct sunlight. With striped leaves forming clusters atop a thin stem, this houseplant can be striking, especially if it reaches its potential height of 12 feet.

Golden pothos (Scindapsus aures): Another powerful plant for tackling formaldehyde, this fast-growing vine will create a cascade of green from a hanging basket. Consider it for your garage since car exhaust is filled with formaldehyde. (Bonus: Golden pothos, also know as devil’s ivy, stays green even when kept in the dark.)