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Tycho's Supernova Remnant

Supernova remnant G266.2-1.2 (NASA, Chandra, 10/28/13)

Remnants of SN 1604, the last supernova to be seen in our galaxy

~~Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A (NASA, Chandra) ~ for the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This stunning visualization of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center~~

The Tycho supernova remnant in the Milky Way, produced by the explosion of a white dwarf star in our galaxy. Low-energy X-rays (red) show expanding debris from the supernova explosion and high energy X-rays (blue) show the blast wave, a shell of extremely energetic electrons. These high-energy X-rays show a pattern of X-ray "stripes" never seen in a supernova remnant.

X-rays from Supernova Remnant SN 1006

Death Star: Eta Carinae, one of the closest stars to Earth is huge and unstable and will likely explode in a supernova in the relatively 'near future' (On an astronomical timeline this could be a million years from now). via NASA #Eta_Carinae #Supernova #NASA

RCW 86: Historical Supernova Remnant In 185 AD, Chinese astronomers recorded the appearance of a new star in the Nanmen asterism - a part of the sky identified with Alpha and Beta Centauri on modern star charts. The new star was visible for months and is thought to be the earliest recorded supernova. RCW 86 is about 8,200 light-years away.

The Crab Nebula with catalog designations M1, NGC 1952, and Taurus A is a supernova remnant and pulsar wind nebula appearing in the constellation of Taurus at a distance of 6,500 light-years. At the center of the nebula lies the Crab Pulsar, a neutron star 28–30 km across with a spin rate of 30.2 times per second. First observed in 1054AD.

The Veil Nebula is a large supernova remnant, the expanding debris cloud from the death explosion of a massive star. While the Veil is roughly circular in shape covering nearly 3 degrees on the sky appearing in the constellation Cygnus, this portion of the eastern Veil spans only 1/2 degree, about the apparent size of the Moon. That translates to 12 light-years at the Veil's estimated distance of 1,400 light-years from planet Earth.