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Courtney White
Courtney White • 1 year ago

Sacajawea. Stolen, held captive, sold, eventually reunited the Shoshone Indians. She was an interpreter and guide for Lewis and Clark in 1805-1806 with her husband Toussaint Charbonneau. She navigated carrying her son, Jean Baptiste, on her back. She traveled thousands of miles from the Dakotas the Pacific Ocean. The explorers, said she was cheerful, never complained, and proved to be invaluable. She served as an advisor, caretaker, and is legendary for her perseverance and resourcefulness.

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Sacajawea. Stolen, held captive, sold, eventually reunited the Shoshone Indians. She was an interpreter and guide for Lewis and Clark in 1805-1806 with her husband Toussaint Charbonneau. She navigated carrying her son, Jean Baptiste, on her back. She traveled thousands of miles from the Dakotas the Pacific Ocean. The explorers, said she was cheerful, never complained, and proved to be invaluable. She served as an advisor, caretaker, and is legendary for her perseverance and resourcefulness.

Sacagawea: Lemhi Shoshone woman who accompanied Lewis and Clark Expedition

Sacagawea, a Shoshone Indian woman, and her infant son, Jean Baptiste, accompanied Meriweather Lewis and William Clark on their exploration of the western part of the United States from 1804-1806.

Jeanette "Jennie" Jerome (1854-1921) was one of three pretty daughters of financier Leonard Jerome and his wife Clara. She married Lord Randolph Churchill, second son of the Duke of Marlborough. She had two children, Winston Churchill, the future prime minister, and John. She had many affairs during her marriage, including with King Edward VII. After her husband died, she married a man as young as her sons, which was very shocking for the time. She subsequently married an even younger man.

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Marie Martinez, Pueblo Indian woman, via Flickr.

Pueblo Maiden, 1890 by Legends of America, via Flickr

Elder Indian Woman by venetiakelley, via Flickr

No-Ah-Tuh, Medicine woman, 1913 by Legends of America, via Flickr