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Holly Moore
Holly Moore • 1 year ago

After parcel post service was introduced in 1913, at least two children were sent by the service. With stamps attached to their clothing, the children rode with railway and city carriers to their destination. The Postmaster General quickly issued a regulation forbidding the sending of children in the mail after hearing of those examples.

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1913 - After parcel post service was introduced in 1913, at least two children were sent by the service. With stamps attached to their clothing, the children rode with railway and city carriers to their destination. The Postmaster General quickly issued a regulation forbidding the sending of children in the mail after hearing of those examples.

in the early 1950s programs were started to issue dog-tags to children. There was concern that in the event of a surprise atomic attack it would be difficult to identify the millions of children killed while at school.

Rare to see such a funny expression in a picture from the 1800's. Cute

A Vietnamese woman carries her children and possessions on bamboo pole as she tries to escape fierce fighting in the Cholon suburb of Saigon during the Viet Cong Mini Tet offensive of the Vietnam War in May 1968 --- Image by © Nik Wheeler/Corbis

Removing the matte that originally encircled the portrait of the child revealed the lovely hidden mother, unseen since the day of framing.

The Emancipation of Rebecca, Augusta & Rosa | 1863. by Black History Album, via Flickr

Pre-mortem photo? Another Victorian habit: Your child contracts a fever, or you have reason to think an injury or illness may lead to death, you whisk the child off to a photographer. Yep, it happened and they were called Pre-mortem photos. Why suppose that is the case here? The inscription on the back of this tintype has the age and date of death. 3 years old. Which is what she looks like in this photo. Ah, the Victorians. An amazing era to study but some mortifying practices.

African American Children by Black History Album, via Flickr