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13th-Century Food Fights Helped Fuel The Magna Carta

A greedy king who seized food was a key driver of the Magna Carta. That 13th-century document was a key inspiration for the American Revolution 500 years later. But at the time, the barons who negotiated the deal weren't concerned with the rights of starving peasants — these 1 percenters wanted to p...
Chris C
Chris C • 2 years ago

13th-Century Food Fights Helped Fuel The Magna Carta

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