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How cooperation can trump competition in monkeys

Being the top dog -- or, in this case, the top gelada monkey -- is even better if the alpha male is willing to concede at times to subordinates, according to a new study. Alpha male geladas who allowed subordinate competitors into their group had a longer tenure as leader, resulting in an average of...
Ian Smith
Ian Smith • 2 years ago

How cooperation can trump competition in monkeys

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    reversible evolution? That term makes my eye twitch...

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