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Waco Mammoth Site - Waco, Texas

Woolly Mammoth Tooth Fossil.

Redheaded mummy from Sungir, Russia found in houses constructed out of mammoth bones and hide. Southern Russia, between 30,000 and 20,000 BC.

A Young Neanderthal by Ryan Somma, via Flickr

Scientists reveal the surprising genetic identity of early human remains from roughly 400,000 years ago in Spain (Atapuerca). New tests on human bones hidden in a Spanish cave for some 400,000 years set a new record for the oldest human DNA sequence ever decoded—and may scramble the scientific picture of our early relatives. The bones were first thought to belong to European Neanderthals, but analysis showed they are genetically closer to the Siberian Denisovans.

A New View of Evolution by sciencemag: This is a 1.77-million-year-old complete adult skull (braincase volume: 546 cubic centimeters) of early Homo from the site of Dmanisi, Georgia. Together with the fossilized bones of four additional individuals discovered in close proximity, the skull indicates that populations of early Homo comprised a wider range of morphological variation than traditionally assumed, which implies a single evolving lineage... #Science #Human_Evolution

Skull Cathedral in Otranto. In 1480AD, Muslim invaders martyred 800 residents of the town of Otranto, Italy. Their remains were taken to the cathedral and the bones were arranged behind the altar as testament to their faith.

An ancient ceremonial site the size of Stonehenge has been discovered on the North Downs. The exact purpose of the site - a neolithic “henge” near Hollingbourne - remains shrouded in mystery, but a large amount of burnt bone and pottery uncovered suggest it was used in a ritual capacity for almost 2000 years, as far back as 2500BC, the end of the Stone Age.

Dinosaur bones seen in the Quarry Exhibit Hall within Dinosaur National Monument, Utah.

Geology of North America

Erosional or structural?

Bone Chalice. Sedlec Ossuary, Kostnice Sedlec, or "Bone Church" in Kutná Hora, Czech Republic. Bone pyramids were stacked in the ossuary by (according to legend) a half-blind monk around 1511, when a mass grave was unearthed and the bones needed a new home. In 1870, František Rint was emplyed to put the bones in order, and so the ex-woodcarver did; among his works of bone art, he left behind his signature in, of course, bones.