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Danielle Kalie
Danielle Kalie • 1 year ago

Dr Campbell's SAFE Arsenic Complexion Wafers. Many who took the cosmetic cure were under the false impression that if a little was good, a lot was better, leading to reported cases of young women going blind or dying by overdosing on the wafers. Arsenic was at it’s height of popularity from the late 1880s to early 1900s, although, advertisements could still be found as late as the 1920s, and in the US, arsenic was only finally banned from cosmetic use in 1938.

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Dr. Rose's Arsenic Complexion Wafers: "These poisonous wafers were advertised as being “simply magical” for the complexion, their most striking effects “being brought about by their steady use.” They were guaranteed to improve “even the coarsest and most repulsive skin and complexion”—especially if you’re into the lurid pallor of death."

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