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U.S. President Lyndon Johnson listens to a tape sent by Captain Charles Robb from Vietnam, 1968. Photo by Jack E. Kightlinger

Chief Quanah Parker with W. C. Riggs at a Fat Stock show in Ft. Worth, TX.

“Stagecoach” Mary Fields (c. 1832-1914) was born a slave in Tennessee and following the Civil War, she moved to the pioneer community of Cascade, Montana. In 1895, when she was around 60 years old, Fields became the second woman and first African American carrier for the US Postal Service. Despite her age, she never missed a day of work in the ten years she carried the mail and earned the nickname “Stagecoach” for her reliability. Fields loved the job, despite the many dangers and difficultie...

1st Native American Woman Marine, Minnie Spotted Wolf of Heart Butte, served from 1943 till 1947.

~~First Ladies Nancy Reagan, Barbara Bush (standing, left to right), Lady Bird Johnson, Pat Nixon, Rosalynn Carter, and Betty Ford (seated, left to right) at the dedication of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, November 1991

The widow Mary Lincoln

A forgotten profession: In the days before alarm clocks were widely affordable, people like Mary Smith of Brenton Street were employed to rouse sleeping people in the early hours of the morning. They were commonly known as ‘knocker-ups’ or ‘knocker-uppers’. Mrs. Smith was paid sixpence a week to shoot dried peas at market workers’ windows in Limehouse Fields, London. Photograph from Philip Davies’ Lost London: 1870-1945.

Veteran of Waterloo with His Wife, 1850

Winston Churchill in his officer’s uniform, age 21, 1895. \\ best comment "They're not leggings, they're pants!" The past wasn;t so far from the present.

ARNOLD GENTHE. The San Francisco Fire, 1906. Great photograph.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt at 18, 1900.