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Susie Cumming
Susie Cumming • 1 year ago

1757-1758 French Sèvres chamber pot at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York - Looking at the elongated oval shape of this piece, I think it was specifically a bourdaloue: a chamber pot designed to allow women to use them without disrobing or attempting to squat while in large and cumbersome dresses. These would be discreetly slipped underneath the skirt and held between the thighs when in use; if executed with grace, a woman could use one standing up.

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