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Flavia Westerwelle
Flavia Westerwelle • 2 years ago

Black basalt rectangular-sided monument recording Esarhaddon’s restoration of Babylon, 670BC (via British Museum). Ancient typography is still beautiful. Truly a timeless design.

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