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Clare Gibson
Clare Gibson • 2 years ago

A Theban terracotta bell idol, c.700 BC; the figure probably represents a nature goddess, maybe of animals and life, and may symbolise the protective forces of nature accompanying the deceased in the afterlife. (Louvre Museum)

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