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Linda Schuster
Linda Schuster • 2 years ago

Anglo-Saxon (600 – 1154): Simple Veils, Head-tires, Combs, and Pin During this time the head was always covered with no hair showing, although it was usually braided elaborately underneath the veil. Veils- made of light-weight fabric like silk, cambric, or fine linen. They were usually rectangular lengths with a hole cut in the middle for putting the head through. Head-tires- circlets of gold that could be worn by any Saxon of rank at this time. The circlets could be made of other material...

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The wimple, a veil that completely covered a woman's neck and chin, was often worn with a veil over the top of the head.

Plantagenet (14th century): Horizontal Braiding, Gorget --when a wimple is worn without a veil, pinned over hair coils on the side of the head. Sometimes the coils were braided horizontally. Horizontal Braiding- popular in the mid 14th century, the head would go uncovered, but sometimes a fillet would support the plaits.

Plantagenet (14th century): Horizontal Braiding, Gorget.Gorget--when a wimple is worn without a veil, pinned over hair coils on the side of the head (Fig. 19). Sometimes the coils were braided horizontally (Fig.18). Horizontal Braiding- popular in the mid 14th century, the head would go uncovered, but sometimes a fillet would support the plaits (Fig. 22).

circlet and veil