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Elizabeth Barrett Browning and her son.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barrett Browning (6 March 1806 – 29 June 1861) was one of the most prominent poets of the Victorian era.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Victorian poetess Elizabeth Barrett Browning: "How do I love thee? Let me count the ways,..."

Elizabeth Barrett Browning - Born in 1806, Elizabeth Barrett Browning published her first major collection, The Seraphim and Other Poems, in 1838. Her Poems (1844) caught the attention of fellow poet Robert Browning, whose admiring letter led to a romance and marriage. The couple moved to Italy, where Elizabeth became interested in spiritualism and Italian politics, and released her popular work Aurora Leigh (1857).

Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1858) by Michele Gordigiani (1830-1909).

Elizabeth Barrett Browning (6 March 1806 – 29 June 1861) was one of the most prominent poets of the Victorian era. Her poetry was widely popular in both England and the United States during her lifetime. A collection of her last poems was published by her husband, Robert Browning, shortly after her death.

elizabeth barrett browning poetry images | How Do I Love Thee? ~ Elizabeth Barrett Browning | Poetry appreciation

In 1930, after Woolf attended the play, The Barretts of Wimpole Street, she began to reread Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s poetry/letters. Woolf’s biography of the Brownings, seen through the lens of their cocker spaniel, was published in 1933, with four drawings by Vanessa Bell. Pinka, the cocker spaniel that Vita Sackville-West gave Woolf in 1926, was photographed for the dust jacket/frontispiece of the first edition. [Virginia Woolf. Flush: A Biography. London: Hogarth Press, 1933].

Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861) was one of the most well-known English poets of the Victorian era. Her Sonnets from the Portuguese, which was published in 1850, is one of the most popular collections of love poems in English, and is considered by critics to be Browning's best work.