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Antique Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

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Antique Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Indian dastana/bazu band (arm guards) and char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran.

Antique Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran.

One side panel of a char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. Chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran in the 16th century. Decorated in gold koftgari (damascene work in which steel is inlaid with gold).

Persian Qajar dynasty char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), 19th century, plate body armor worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. Acid etched with calligraphy and figures of animals and humans surrounded by arabesque designs. The two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. Chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran in the 16th century.

Indian piti (quilted armor) helmet and an unusual char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh) cuirass, with an octagon front plate and mail connections to the other plates, worn over a zirah (shirt of mail).

Persian khula-khud (helmet), char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), literally the four mirrors, chest armor with four plates, bazu band (vambrace/arm guards).

Persian armor, kulah khud (helmet), char-aina (chahar-aina) chest armor with four plates, dastanas/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards) with covered hand guards, zirah (mail shirt) with ganga jamni mail (iron and copper/brass links in a pattern).

Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh)‎, composite, watered steel, comprising four rectangular plates, those at the sides with arched recesses for the arms, three etched with calligraphic panels at the borders and a central foliate cartouche, all enriched with gold koftgari, fitted with reinforced brass borders, and buckles for closure and suspension, and the remaining panel engraved 29 cm; 11 1/2 in high Inscribed with verses in Persian and Arabic, 19th century.

Indian (Mughal) char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail), 18th Century comprising four steel .plaques, two rectangular ones shaped for the underarm, and two for front and back of body, very slightly curved, with incised and damascened decoration consisting of a panel of vines bearing leafy palmettes all within a gilt floral border, with trefoil-shaped buckles 23.2 x 29.2 cm. max.(4)

Armor of the Ottoman Empire. A complete suit of 16th century armor as worn by fully armored cavalryman (sipahi) including Chichak (helmet), krug (chest armor), zirah (mail shirt), kolluk/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), dizcek (cuisse or knee and thigh armor), and kolçak (greaves or shin armor). Stibbert Museum, Florence Italy.

Ottoman krug (chest armor), back plate. 16th-17th Century. A large central circular plate with a raised central boss, five attached top and side plates, shoulder plate, all linked with heavy riveted chain links and embossed or engraved with intricate designs. The top of the plate has a flat top edge, which denotes it is a back plate, breast plates have a neck cut-out. Bequest of George C. Stone, 1935, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.