Categories

Come on in! Join Pinterest today...it only takes like a second or so.

More like this: green lights, red lights and blue lights.
Visit Site
Angela Farr
Angela Farr • 1 year ago

THE CORE OF OUR GALAXY, seen in infrared light by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Blue light is from stars, green light is from polycyclic carbon molecules, yellow and red light is from the thermal glow of warm dust. This image spans approximately 1000 light years by 1600 light years. The galactic core is 26,000 light years away.

Related Pins

THE CORE OF OUR GALAXY, seen in infrared light by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Blue light is from stars, green light is from polycyclic carbon molecules, yellow and red light is from the thermal glow of warm dust. This image spans approximately 1000 light years by 1600 light years. The galactic core is 26,000 light years away. #universe

The core of our galaxy, seen in infrared light by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Blue light is from stars, green light is from polycyclic carbon molecules, yellow and red light is from the thermal glow of warm dust.  This image spans approximately 1000 light years by 1600 light years.  The galactic core is 26000 light years away.

Sombrero Galaxy in infrared light (Hubble Space Telesope and Spitzer Space Telescope)

#Astronomy: #Arp227 consists of two galaxies in the constellation #Pisces: the large (250,000 light-years across) lenticular galaxy #NGC474 (also known as UGC 864) located about 93 million light-years away, and the spiral galaxy #NGC470 at about 95 million light-years away. They lie at a separation of about 160,000 light-years.

A beautiful new image of two colliding galaxies has been released by NASA's Great Observatories. The Antennae galaxies, located about 62 million light-years from Earth, are shown in this composite image from the Chandra X-ray Observatory (blue), the Hubble Space Telescope (gold and brown), and the Spitzer Space Telescope (red).

The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared One of the largest galaxies in the nearby Virgo Cluster of Galaxies. The dark band of dust that obscures the mid-section of the Sombrero Galaxy in optical light actually glows brightly in infrared light. The above image, digitally sharpened, shows the infrared glow, recently recorded by the orbiting Spitzer Space Telescope

The Sombrero Galaxy, also known as M104, spans about 50,000 light years across and lies 28 million light years away.

This galaxy is 300million light years away from the Milky Way

light years away