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Sikh Millworkers Barnet B.C. c. 1905. Sikhs have been living in North America for over a 100 years. Early pioneers came to work in the lumber mills, mines and railroads. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Private Buckam Singh, Discovering a Canadian Hero

Sacred Temple and Tank – Umritsir From a Sketch by William Carpenter, Engraved by J.C. Armytage, ca. 1854, engraving. Notice the large mysterious building to the left of The Golden Temple on the parkarma. No such structure exists today, this is The Lost Palace of Amritsar, to learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - The Lost Palace of Amritsar

Tank & Marble Causeway the Sikh Temple Amritsar, Artist: William Carpenter, ca. Feb 1854, paint on paper. A majestic palace unlike any other once glimmered in the waters of the sacred pool of nectar at Amritsar. An unusual view painted from the south edge of the parkarma. The major structures appearing in this view from left to right are the Akal Takht, the Darshani Deori gateway, the Lost Palace and Darbar Sahib. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - The Lost Palace of Amritsar

Clock Tower of Amritsar ca. January 24, 1906, photographed by Hannah P. Adams from the rooftop of Darbar Sahib, gelatin silver print. The large out of place Gothic style clock tower built by the British and completed in 1874 dominated over Darbar Sahib and the Amritsar skyline. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - The Lost Palace of Amritsar

A Sikh school at Amritsar, India. Stereo Travel Company, ca. 1908, stereoview. The relatively narrow width of the older marble parkarma at the Golden Temple Complex can be seen in this photograph. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - The Lost Palace of Amritsar

India of tomorrow - handsome schoolboys of Amritsar at the Golden Temple beside the Holy Tank. ca. 1904, Underwood & Underwood Ltd. London. The two Nishan Sahibs at the Akal Takht in the background contain unusual symbols. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Nishan Sahib, History of the Sacred Banner and its Symbols

Maharaja Ranjit Singh listening to the Granth being recited near the Golden Temple, Amritsar. Artist: August Schoefft, ca. 1840's - 1855, Vienna, from a sketch made by Schoefft in Amritsar, 1841. oil on canvas, 143.5 x 109 cm, A detailed analysis of this painting is the focal point of the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - The Maharaja in the Guru's Darbar

Maharaja Ranjit Singh, ca. 1830, Gouache heightened on gold with paper. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - The Maharaja in the Guru's Darbar

Maharaja Sher Singh seated on the golden throne of Maharaja Ranjit Singh, Artist: August Schoefft, ca. 1840's - 1855, Vienna, from preliminary study made in Lahore 1841. oil on canvas, 142.2 x 113 cm. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - The Maharaja in the Guru's Darbar

Fezli Azam Joo, wife of General Court. Artist: August Schoefft, ca.1841, Lahore, oil on canvas, 89.5 x 70.5 cm. General Court was one of the leading European officers in the Khalsa Army of Maharaja Ranjit Singh. From the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - The Maharaja in the Guru's Darbar

Kenya Khanda Stamp ca. 1984, Kenya. The first known stamp to feature the Sikh khanda emblem. Issued by the Government of Kenya to commemorate the Fourth World Assembly at Nairobi by members of the the World Conference of Religions for Peace. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Nishan Sahib, History of the Sacred Banner and its Symbols

Closeup of a photograph titled 'Three Sikh Guardians of the Temple' Photographer Hannah P. Adams, ca. January 24, 1906, silver gelatin print, Amritsar. Photographed by an American tourist visiting Darbar Sahib this important photograph reveals one of the very early appearances of the modern Sikh Khanda emblem. It is worn by the Nihang below the Shiva Crescents on his turban. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Nishan Sahib, History of the Sacred Banner and its Symbols

Guru Gobind Singh Celebration flyer Khalsa Divan Society, ca. December 1911, Vancouver, Canada. A flyer promoting the upcoming December 27th, 1911 celebration at the Vancouver Gurdwara of the birth of Guru Gobind Singh. This flyer represents one of the very earliest uses of the modern day Sikh Khanda emblem by an organization or gurdwara. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Nishan Sahib, History of the Sacred Banner and its Symbols

Actual proportions and scale of the weapons comprising the Sikh Khanda emblem. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Nishan Sahib, History of the Sacred Banner and its Symbols

Sikh Nishan Sahib, Photographer: Sandeep Singh Brar. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Nishan Sahib, History of the Sacred Banner and its Symbols

The Ten Sikh Gurus, ca. late 19th century - early 20th century, paint on paper. Two distinct types of religious emblems appear in this painting. The topmost larger emblem is composed of two crossed swords, a bow, trident spear and a chakkar quoit. The other variation near the bottom has two crossed swords, a bow, two crossed axes, a trident spear and a chakkar quoit. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Nishan Sahib, History of the Sacred Banner and its Symbols

Sikh Military Turban Badge ca. late 19th century - early 20th century, brass with silver coating. A turban badge likely belonging to a military unit of one of the Sikh Kingdoms. The badge consists of a khanda sword above a chakkar quoit with two crossed curved swords below the quoit and two crossed axes within the chakkar. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Nishan Sahib, History of the Sacred Banner and its Symbols

Guru Gobind Singh and Attendants, ca. 1830's, gold plated copper plate, Darbar Sahib. Located on the front face of the exterior upper wall portions of Darbar Sahib this scene features a prominent Sikh Nishan Sahib banner. The banner includes a tulwar sword, a dhal shield and at the very bottom a katar dagger. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Nishan Sahib, History of the Sacred Banner and its Symbols

Sikh Silver Rupee, Lahore Mint, ca. 1837 (V.S. 1893, frozen year V.S. 1885). A very rare coin and one of the only coins produced during the reign of the Sikh Empire with human figures. Maharaja Ranjit Singh is depicted presenting a lotus flower to Guru Nanak. Between the two figures can be seen a Nishan Sahib with patterned outer border and an inner bordered segment. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Nishan Sahib, History of the Sacred Banner and its Symbols

Among the assortments of weapons worn by members of the Nihang sect in their turbans is an emblem called the Aad Chand that is often mistaken by some as a stylized or old style Khanda emblem. This symbol in not the Sikh Khanda emblem but one that is unique and specific to the belief system of the Nihangs. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Nishan Sahib, History of the Sacred Banner and its Symbols

Trident with Shiva as Ardhanari (Half-Woman) ca. 1050, Chola dynasty, South India. A Shiva sculpture almost a thousand years old can easily be mistaken for the Sikh Khanda emblem. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Nishan Sahib, History of the Sacred Banner and its Symbols

View a Sikh Wedding through the lens of 3D Virtual Reality photography. See the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - A Sikh Wedding

View a Sikh Wedding through the lens of 3D Virtual Reality photography. See the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - A Sikh Wedding

1984 Indian Army attack on the Sikh Golden Temple Complex in Amritsar, Punjab. Interior view of original Akal Takht prior to its destruction by the Indian Army. To learn more see the SikhMuseum.com Exhibit - Operation Bluestar