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Institute of the Future

TIDE DRESS. ‘All You Can Get’ fashion spread, photographer Ryan Yoon captures fashion made from unusual objects for the premier issue of Virgine Magazine.

Kevin Allocca: Why videos go viral

Understanding the Chinese consumer Laurent Philippe, the head of Procter & Gamble in China, explores how to beat the competition in the country’s huge and complex market. JULY 2004 • Jacques Penhirin In This Article Exhibit 1: Biography of P&G's Laurent Philippe Exhibit 2: P&G's revenues from emerging markets Exhibit 3: McKinsey profiles of consumer behavior in China Exhibit 4: A profile of P&G's Beijing R&D center China's market for consumer goods is growing quickly, stimulated by a strong economy that is putting more disposable income into the people's pockets. Competition to serve consumer needs is intense; multinational companies are battling one another and also taking on increasingly sophisticated Chinese players. One of the bigger issues facing multinational consumer goods companies in China is their ability to serve the mass market cost-effectively—an important advantage of the local competitors. Procter & Gamble, one of the world's leading consumer goods companies, is facing this challenge head-on. P&G is the most successful foreign marketer in China as measured by market share, with leadership positions in four of the seven product categories in which the company competes. Last year, China generated almost $1.8 billion in sales for P&G, or about 3 percent of its total revenues. While growth has slowed in major markets such as the United States, sales have risen much more briskly in China. In 2003 it was P&G's sixth-largest market, up from tenth just three years earlier. Leadership hasn't come easily. Procter & Gamble entered the Chinese market through a joint venture in 1988. For many years, the company focused its marketing effort on premium-priced products—its traditional path—in...

P&G China; 5.18 billion and 5.8% market share. Data from CTR China: The daily chemical giant P&G has been ranked at top among all the big players in China with its 5.18 billion us dollars ad expenditure in 2010.

At Fortune's Brainstorm Tech conference, Procter & Gamble's top executives discuss the company's digital strategy. P&G CEO Bob McDonald FORTUNE -- As companies go, Procter & Gamble may be an old dog, but that doesn't mean it can't learn new tricks. That's what CEO Bob McDonald is claiming, as he attempts to turn the consumer product giant into a model of business in the digital age. To accomplish this, McDonald has formed a close alliance with P&G CIO Filippo Passerini, who shared the stage with McDonald on Tuesday, kicking off Fortune's Brainstorm Tech conference in Aspen. Together, McDonald and Passerini have identified 88 distinct business processes underlying the $79 billion company's operations. For each one they have analyzed the time it takes from the moment data comes to when it can be applied to the business. By using technology to develop predictive models, they've found they can accelerate decision-making and compress the time it takes to act. The ultimate goal: to run the business in real-time and collapse the organization by allowing all P&G (PG) employees to get the same data at the same time. As a result of these efforts, said Passerini, "We've been able to reduce $900 million in cost over the past eight years." One example: Until recently, P&G had a team of 5000 dedicated to demand planning. Each one had a set of inputs and techniques they used in their individual spreadsheet to make predictions. This Friday, McDonald will inaugurate a new facility in Cincinnati to aggregate demand planning using computer models, which means a good portion of those thousands of workers will be redeployed. "We review the profit forecast, the volume forecast in real time, and we make decisions to change at that point in time," explained McDonald. "If we had not had that capability, we probably would not have hit the quarters the way we hit them in the first half of the year, as the economy was heading south." McDonald also described how technology had transformed the way the company gathers feedback from its 4.2 billion customers. Remember those 1-800 numbers that used to appear on the back of all P&G products? Today P&G brand managers have a virtual "cockpit" dashboard that aggregates tweets, blogs, and emails to give them an up to the minute understanding of consumer perceptions. And of course McDonald couldn't fail to mention how technology (and a certain charming actor named Isaiah Mustafa) has helped Old Spice body wash and deodorant claim the number one spot in their categories. Thanks to the viral nature of the "Smell like a man, man" campaign online, P&G racked up 1.8 million free impressions. Said McDonald, who foresees a day when P&G's brands will have one-on-one relationships with its billions of customers, "Advertising is very different today.  You don't talk to somebody. You engage them in a discussion and you give them the freedom to participate in that discussion, and actually to advertise for you." McDonald knows that making such dramatic changes means you can't just relegate technology to the IT department. For the HR department that translates to a mandate to hire and train people so that they are technologically literate. In fact, technology competency now factors in to every employee's performance review. But Passerini said that getting P&G employees to buy in to the digital revolution hasn't been a problem. "What we try to do is to make our solutions so compelling, and so attractive that there is really not push back." Does that include McDonald? "My ideal is always on, always connected," he said, but he's not a Blackberry user because the device doesn't allow him to type fast enough. Instead, McDonald carries a small computer with a full keyboard that allows him to connect to whatever nearby cell phone towers exist in whatever country. "I don't believe in a cloud because sometimes I can't connect to a cloud in Kenya or Ethiopia." No matter how progressive P&G may be with technology, it appears some concepts are still outside the company's comfort zone.

Five things to know about online grocery shopping: Consumers love online grocery shopping, but it takes time getting used to. You can simply the process by improving the online experience with navigation, search, online help and porting over shopping lists. Deliver a better time-saving experience and consumers will hang on. Online baskets are different than offline baskets. The average transaction size is much larger for food and beverages ($80 online / $30 offline) and health and beauty purchase ($30 online / $10 offline). And online shopping offers a greater mix of pack sizes and categories. Consumer perceptions and purchase behaviors are affected in important ways. The interactions with the online ‘store’ environment are fundamentally different than an in-store experience. The online experience is fueled by a needs-driven experience as a greater variety of options are made available on screen. Online shopping “levels the playing field”. Big brand ‘physical’ advantages do not translate online. With universal distribution and search functionality an inherent bias toward niche players is created. Ultimately, price transparency, connectivity and open content favor a purely ‘rational’ market. Large and small brands can win online by combining marketing savvy with digital capabilities to add value. With interactive websites, smartphone applications and social media connections, expanding your brands in new and innovative directions is virtually limitless.

Most young people with mobile phones choose their own device, with price being the main purchase driver. Interestingly, more males than females have smartphones in every country except for the U.S., where women lead the way in smartphone usage – certainly an opportunity for manufacturers trying to target their up-and-coming key demographic. See the numbers below and read more here. How can you create apps and mobile experiences for Gen Y women?

Energizer Personal Care brand Schick Intuition just launched a new, interactive coupon-oriented Facebook application (www.facebook.com/...) asking customers to tune into their intution while they tune into some of the top social media influencers: Melanie Notkin, Founder of The Savvy Auntie, Kimberley Clayton-Blaine, Executive Producer of TheGoToMom.TV and MommyToMommyTv.com and Audrey McClelland, Founder of MomGenerations.com. “Schick Intuition is excited to escort consumers on the journey to discover the secrets to simplifying their active lifestyles,” says Chit Itchon, senior brand manager Schick Intuition. “We’re looking forward to interacting with our fans through this program, and start a dialogue around simple tips that can make a difference in their daily lives.” Now until October 30, 2011 fans can visit www.Facebook.com/... to take the “Intuition IQ” quiz and discover if they are “Simple Carefree,” “Simply Flexible” or “Simply Smart.” After taking the quiz, fans are able to download a $3.00 coupon for any Intuition razor or 3ct. refills.

Personalized f-Commerce Campaign from Heinz No Comments | Category: Sampling, fCommerce | Posted by: Rebecca Thorman Ah, the Brits are selling personalized cans of soup on Facebook – here are the details: The pop-up store allows Heinz fans (and-only fans) to send personalised ‘get-well’ cans of Heinz soup to friends suffering from post-summer distress disorder – i.e. Autumn colds and chills, for a £1.99 ($3.00) PayPal payment via an store app on the brand’s Facebook page. The customised cans feature a personal get-well message on the label, via a custom store app on the Heinz fan-page from London-based social media agency We Are Social. Personalized f-Commerce Campaign from Heinz No Comments | Category: Sampling, fCommerce | Posted by: Rebecca Thorman Ah, the Brits are selling personalized cans of soup on Facebook – here are the details: The pop-up store allows Heinz fans (and-only fans) to send personalised ‘get-well’ cans of Heinz soup to friends suffering from post-summer distress disorder – i.e. Autumn colds and chills, for a £1.99 ($3.00) PayPal payment via an store app on the brand’s Facebook page. The customised cans feature a personal get-well message on the label, via a custom store app on the Heinz fan-page from London-based social media agency We Are Social. What we really like about this Heinz pop-up fan-store is that it taps into Facebook strengths – gifting – an eminently social activity, and personalisation (although not, in this case, via the social graph). Personalised gifts in Facebook make real sense. Kudos Heinz. Heinz is emerging as something of a poster-child for f-commerce in FMCG/CPG – earlier in the year it opened a pop-up fan-store in Facebook to support the launch of a new line of ketchup by offering fans exclusive fan-first access to the product before it became available in-store (also by We Are Social). And last month, Heinz ran a social couponing campaign, where the value of the coupon doubled when shared. What we really like about this Heinz pop-up fan-store is that it taps into Facebook strengths – gifting – an eminently social activity, and personalisation (although not, in this case, via the social graph). Personalised gifts in Facebook make real sense. Kudos Heinz. Heinz is emerging as something of a poster-child for f-commerce in FMCG/CPG – earlier in the year it opened a pop-up fan-store in Facebook to support the launch of a new line of ketchup by offering fans exclusive fan-first access to the product before it became available in-store (also by We Are Social). And last month, Heinz ran a social couponing campaign, where the value of the coupon doubled when shared.