Categories

Come on in! Join Pinterest today...it only takes like a second or so.

An unusual antique silk kimono that combines both modern and traditional design elements, featuring bold green narcissuses and bold striping. Patterning technique seems to be yuzen-dyeing. Meiji Period (1868-1911), Japan. The Kimono Gallery

Furisode, Late Edo period (1789–1868), 19th century Silk, 4:1 satin damask weave (rinzu); embroidered with silk and gold-leaf-over-lacquered-paper-strip-wrapped silk in satin stitches; laid work and couching, and padded couching; lined with silk, plain weave 183.8 x 128.8 cm (72 1/4 x 50 3/4 in.). First the edges of the trunk were padded with a heavy thread; then, over this padding, gold-wrapped thread was couched with red silk thread.The Art Institute of Chicago

Furisode | The Art Institute of Chicago

artic.edu

Japanese silk kimono, shades of chocolate, melon pink and pale green, embroidered with heavily embellished wisteria, chrystanthemum and other flowers

Tatewaku Kimono 1910s Tatewaku (Geyser) is a spring motif, symbolizing the steam rising from plants at the first spring heat. This postcard is back-stamped Sakai City, Osaka Prefecture. Osaka Maiko Yachiyo II named after her famous predecessor at the Tonda geisha house.

Scan E3. Scan from book: 300 years of Japanese women’s appearance, kimono, kanzashi etc.  ISBN4-87940-541-8.  Furisode and obi appear mid-19th century.  Images scanned by Limikettu of Flickr

Scan E2. Scan from book: 300 years of Japanese women’s appearance, kimono, kanzashi etc. ISBN4-87940-541-8. Furisode and obi appear mid-19th century. Images scanned by Limikettu of Flickr

Scan E1. Scan from book: 300 years of Japanese women’s appearance, kimono, kanzashi etc. ISBN4-87940-541-8. Furisode and obi appear mid-19th century. Images scanned by Limikettu of Flickr

Scan A1. Scans from book: 300 years of Japanese women’s appearance, kimono, kanzashi etc. ISBN4-87940-541-8. An incredible set of shots of a tayuu (courtesan) dress.  The opulant heavily-embroidered uchikake (outer kimono) and obi appear to date to the mid-19th century.  Images scanned by Lumikettu of Flickr

Kioto Dancing Girl by Kusakabe Kimbei 1880s. This hand-coloured albumen photograph shows a maiko (apprentice geisha) from Kyoto dressed in an elaborate dove motif kimono.

Ancient kimono in Edo Museum, Tokyo // photo by Clarissa Capitoni

Two Maiko Girls in a Doll Shop 1950s vintage postcard by Benrido Co. Ltd (I'm wild about the multi-textured and colored fabrics used on the left kimono)

Genroku Style Travelling Clothes 1907, A Tokyo Geisha wearing a Tsubo-shozoku (travelling outfit) consisting of a Kosode (short-sleeved kimono) decorated with large patterns of the "Hitta-kanoko-shibori" variety, typical of the Genroku period (1688-1703), and holding an Ichime-gasa (city hat) in one hand and a Sutekki (walking stick) in the other.

PPall: Mitsuyo by Joyce Ogi, via Flickr

Wedding kimono (uchikake) from Edo period, 19th century, Japan

awesome furisode kimono and obi