Categories
Log in
There’s more to see...
Sign up to see the rest of what’s here!

Best in Bloom

The ultimate inspirational plant list. See a plant you want to add to your landscape? Repin it!

Shrubs will provide your garden with lush, carefree beauty. Here, a flowering 'Limelight' hydrangea mingles with the cream-rimmed foliage of an Ivory Halo dogwood. | Photo: John Gruen

A Private and Inviting Front Yard

thisoldhouse.com

These long-lasting blooms will take you into the fall with little to no fuss

Shrub-Type Roses

thisoldhouse.com

Plant fall crocuses now: The saffron crocus will bloom in 6 to 8 weeks; the spice can be harvested for cooking by removing the bright red stigmas at the center. | Photo: J S Sira/GAP Photos

6 Fast Fixes for August

thisoldhouse.com

'Limelight' hydrangeas, Ivory Halo dogwoods, and daylilies soften the street side of the fence. | Photo: John Gruen

A Private and Inviting Front Yard

thisoldhouse.com

Flamingo cockscomb (celosia spicata) are known for their graceful, rosy pink flower spikes on 3- to 4-foot stems. Easy to grow, they're great for drying. In long-season areas, seeds may be started outdoors.

A layer of smaller petals along the inside of over-size blooms make the Lollipop Gerber Daisy a stand out in your garden. With a long bloom time, from spring to early frost, one plant can produce dozens of flowers in a single season.

Flowers drape and spill over the sides of weathered wood containers on a sheltered flagstone patio that now fronts a 1950s house in Southern California. | Photo: Jennifer Cheung

Timeless Treasure Garden

thisoldhouse.com

Wood Violet: The moisture-loving wildflower commonly makes itself at home in woodlands, stream banks, and well-watered lawns. Violets are self-sowing, hardy groundcovers that bloom profusely over long periods in summer and may self-seed freely. | Photo: John W Bova/Photo Researchers/Getty

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com

Rosebay Rhododendron: Clusters of bell-shaped flowers, spotted with olive green to orange, bloom late in the season. Its glossy evergreen foliage, cold hardiness, and willingness to flower even in dense, shaded woods are much of the shrub's charm. | Photo: homeredwardprice/Magnus Maske/Wikimedia Commons

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com

Coast Rhododendron: In mid- to late spring, compact trusses of rose, purple, or white flowers bloom. Its evergreen foliage provides a leafy backdrop year-round. Suitable for sun, it can grow to an impressive 15 feet tall and wide. | Photo: Gregory MD./Photo Researchers/Getty

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com

Flowering Dogwood: In late spring, small clusters of pale green flowers surrounded by white or pink bracts emerge, followed by clusters of bright red fruit and showy red fall foliage. Given well-drained soil and a little shade, it makes a lovely landscape tree, reaching up to 40 feet tall. | Photo: OGphoto/E+/Getty

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com

Red Clover: Farmers grow red clover as food for cows and other animals. Though rarely grown in garden settings, it makes an effective cover crop for the vegetable patch, where it boosts soil nitrogen during the off-season. | Photo: Evelyn Simak/GeographBot/Wikimedia Commons

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com

Sego Lily: Native Americans and early settlers used to feast on the bulbs of these late-spring-blooming flowers, eating them roasted, boiled, or raw; and the delicate flowers, which bloom white, lavender, or yellow, still grow naturally in the Great Basin's open grasslands

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com

Texas Bluebonnet: Water seeds only on the day of planting, and water transplants sparingly, repeating only when soil is dry an inch down. Though the Texas native (shown) is commonly deep violet, other cultivars include some intriguing non-blue colors, like cream 'Noble Maiden' and maroon-and-white 'Alamo Fire.' | Photo: Saxon Holt/Photo Botanic

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com

Iris: Plant this sun-loving perennial in late summer, water it well, and fertilize in spring and after blooms fade. Standouts include bearded, almost-black 'Superstition' and the Siberian yellow-and-white 'Butter and Sugar' (shown). | Photo: Mark Bolton/GAP Photos

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com

Pasque Flower: A buttercup relative that grows wild across America, especially at higher altitudes, this perennial likes dry, sandy soil and full sun and is fairly drought tolerant. It grows from seed sown in fall, blooms in shades of violet to white, and produces dramatic seed heads before going dormant in summer heat. | Photo: Ernst Kucklich

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com

Yellow Jessamine: A fast grower but well mannered, prefers sun but still blooms in shade, and adapts to most soil conditions. | Photo: Tian Ying/Wikimedia Commons

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com

Violet: A prolific self-seeding perennial that tolerates clay soils, it's happiest in partial sun and moist, well-drained beds. Plant it in spring or fall from seed or transplants. For variations on the violet theme, look for 'Freckles,' pale with purple speckles, or the snowy white 'Albiflora' (shown). | Photo: Tommy Tonsberg/GAP Photos

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com

Mountain Laurel has showy pink or white flowers and typically grows as a dense, rounded shrub and prefers well-drained, acidic soil.

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com

The Oregon grape sports canary yellow flowers in spring atop a cradle of prickly evergreen leaves. Edible berries follow and ripen to a metallic blue-black by fall.

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com

Oklahoma Rose: Dark red, fragrant, and an impressive 5 inches across, the blooms appear in flushes throughout the growing season. Like all hybrid tea roses, 'Oklahoma' requires full sun and ample water. It can be grown in the ground or in a winter-protected container.

50 State Flowers to Grow Anywhere

thisoldhouse.com