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Frozen wave in Antarctica

Meet the largest bat on earth- the Pemba flying fox. These bats are fruit and nectar eaters with an average wingspan of 6'. :D I want oneee

Perseid meteor streaking over the lightpainted double arch in Arches National Park. by tmo-photo on Flickr.

This is a chimera cat, who is it's own fraternal twin. (When two fertilized eggs fuse together)

Delamination of a polymer coating on a silicon wafer after being subject to a cleaning agent | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World

TFT computer screen with covers removed to reveal transistors | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World

Great Purple Hairstreak Butterfly (Atlides halesus) eggs on mistletoe (Phoradendron sp.) leaf | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World

Inverted Vampire squid. Vampire squid have eight webbed arms, tipped with suckers and lined with fleshy spines (called cirri), and two retractable sensory filaments. When threatened, it inverts so that the cirri point outwards in a menacing fashion

This Upper Cretaceous specimen is a superb specimen of Shenodiscus lenticulares. It comes from the U.S. badlands, Fox Hills formation, South Dakota. The collector was also the preparator in this case and took great pride in this work of art.

Fossil Crinoids (Uintacrinus socialis), Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.

The crowned slug caterpillar. Stinging setae line the craned slug's perimeter, decorating its flattened, green body. Later in star's may also be marked with colorful red and yellow spots along the caterpillar's back. It is found in woodlands, from Florida to Mississippi, north all the way to Minnesota, southern Ontario, and Massachusetts. It feeds mostly on oak, but also elm, hickory and maple.

During a month long survey, 87 moth species, including the impressive poplar hawk moth, were recorded

We can learn a lot from the fruit fly, Drosophila. About 50% of fly genes have a counterpart in our own genome. This picture shows Drosophila sperm cells with tails. Their long tails or flagella, curl around in circles. Scientists have no idea why fly sperm need tails up to six centimetres, since this is 20 times the length of the fly itself.