Categories

Come on in! Join Pinterest today...it only takes like a second or so.

Irena Sendler 1910-2008 A 98 year-old German woman named Irena Sendler recently died. During WWII, Irena worked in the Warsaw Ghetto as a plumbing/sewer specialist. Irena smuggled Jewish children out; infants in the bottom of the tool box she carried and older children in a burlap sack she carried in the back of her truck. She also had a dog in the back that she trained to bark when the Nazi soldiers let her in and out of the ghetto.

  • Tone Lepsøe

    The soldiers wanted nothing to do with the dog, and the barking covered the kids’ and infants’ noises. Irena managed to smuggle out and save 2500 children. She eventually was caught, and the Nazis broke both her legs, arms and beat her severely. Irena kept a record of the names of all the kids she smuggled out and kept them in a glass jar buried under a tree in her backyard. After the war, she tried to locate any parents that may have survived and reunited some of the families. Most had been killed. She helped those children get placement into foster family homes or adopted. Last year Irena was up for the Nobel Peace Prize. She was not selected. Al Gore won- for a slide show on Global Warming.

The story of Aung San Suu Kyi as she becomes the core of Burma's democracy movement, and her relationship with her husband, writer Michael Aris.

Aung San Suu Kyi with her first born son, Alexander Aris, in London. (blog.tsemtulku.com)

Mother Teresa coming down stairs, 1970. Photo © Raghu Rai/Magnum Photos

Kim Phuc was pictured in a world-famous and iconic photograph from the Vietnam war, running naked from an airborne attack, horribly burned with napalm, in June of 1972. Since then, Kim has found peace, and a message she can offer, borne of her suffering. She runs The Kim Foundation International, and she acts as a Goodwill Ambassador for UNESCO. She has transformed into a viable, visible symbol of peace and hope. Hers is an important story of resilience, courage, and forgiveness.

Susan B Anthony pummeled and arrested for attempting to vote in 1872. She was fined 100 dollars for registering to vote.

Dorothy Day with her prison dress. On November 1917 Day went to prison for being one of forty women in front of the White House protesting women's exclusion from the electorate.

Carmen De Lavallade was born in Los Angeles, California, March 6, 1936, to Creole parents from New Orleans, Louisiana. She became a member of the Lester Horton Dance Theater in 1949. She studied other art forms, including painting, acting, music, set design and costuming, as well as ballet and other forms of modern and ethnic dance. In 1955, she married dancer and actor Geoffrey Holder. The photo is of the two of them and was taken in 1955 by Carl Van Vechten.

THE BRIDE. She stands there alone and the tears flow, and shame on the cheeks really passionate. For the man she loved was he not believe, with scorn and sneer he cheated on her. But now it was enough and she threw him out, back he stood there dumb as a bull. He begged and prayed, he was humble, for he was the father of the child she was carrying.

Artist/bohemian Beatrice Wood. Interesting biography, her most productive years were from age 80 until her death at 105.

Lady Sarah Forbes Bonetta Davies, photographed by Camille Silvy, 1862 Sarah Forbes Bonetta Davies was a child born into a royal West African dynasty. She was orphaned in 1848, when her parents were killed in a slave-hunting war. She was around five years old. In 1850, Sarah was taken to England and presented to Queen Victoria as a “gift” from the King of Dahomey. She became the queen’s goddaughter and a celebrity known for her extraordinary intelligence.

"this is the only probable picture of Kate Warne, the first female detective. Not only was she the first detective, but she even went on to save the life of president elect Abraham Lincoln after uncovering a plot to assassinate him on the way to Washington D.C. to take office. She was best known for being a master of disguise, able to switch from Union soldier, to Southern debutante, to a harmless grandmother." (I am sure there are more women out there who are as strong! kn)

Bessie Smith, blues singer. Smith felt no fear when it came to confronting the racism so prevalent in the South. Once, when performing a tent show in a Southern town, members of the Ku Klux Klan, in full Klan regalia, surrounded the tent, threatening to pull it down and trap everyone inside. Smith stormed out and confronted them, shouting, “You had better pick up them sheets and run!” The men took to their heels. Smith went back to performing, as if confronting the KKK were all ...

“Elizabeth Blackwell (3 February 1821 – 31 May 1910) was the first female doctor in the United States and the first on the UK Medical Register. She was the first openly identified woman to graduate from medical school, a pioneer in educating women in medicine in the United States, and was prominent in the emerging women's rights movement.”

Rosa Parks is famous for her refusal on December 1, 1955 to obey bus driver James Blake's demand that she relinquish her seat to a white man. Her subsequent arrest and trial for this act of civil disobedience triggered the Montgomery Bus Boycott, one of the largest and most successful mass movements against racial segregation in history.

Queen of Egypt and the last pharaoh. She was 17 or 18 when she became queen. Cleopatra was a shrewd politician who spoke nine languages. During her reign, Egypt became closely aligned with the Roman Empire.