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Ancient Franks, Merovingians, Carolingians And The Lombards

The Germanic tribes achieved conquest over a mix of people, including the Gauls, the Bretons, the Belges, and the Gascons. The Kingdom of the Franks expanded from Austrasia, established by the Merovingian dynasty. Their territory corresponded largely to ancient Gaul as well as Raetia, Germania Superior and Germania Magna.

Atelier Verdande Frankish Gerberga everyday garb. love this wrap coat! (scrap useage!!!)

Atelier Verdande

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Disk Brooch. Frankish, 6th century CE. Medium: Copper alloy, paste, iron core. Dimensions: Overall: 13/16 x 5/16 in. (2.1 x 0.8 cm). Classification: Metalwork-Copper alloy Credit Line: Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917. Accession Number: 17.191.155. In the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Disk Brooch | Frankish | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Disk Brooch. Frankish, 6th century CE. Medium: Copper alloy, partial gilt, remnant of iron pin. Dimensions: Overall: 1 3/8 x 5/16 in. (3.5 x 0.8 cm). Classification: Metalwork-Copper alloy Credit Line: Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917 Accession Number: 17.191.18. In the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Disk Brooch | Frankish | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

metmuseum.org

Disk Brooch, Frankish, date: ca. 550–650 CE. Medium: Copper alloy, silver, partial gilt, garnet, foil. Dimensions: Overall: 1 x 3/8 in. (2.5 x 0.9 cm). Classification: Metalwork-Copper alloy. Credit Line: Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917 Accession Number: 17.192.80. In the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Disk Brooch | Frankish | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

metmuseum.org

Disk Brooch, Frankish or northern French, 550-600 CE. Copper alloy, silver wire and glass paste. Dimensions: Overall: 1 3/16 x 7/16 in. (3 x 1.1 cm) Classification: Metalwork-Copper alloy. Credit Line: Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917. Accession Number: 17.192.81. In the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Burial Shroud of Emperor Charlemagne, 814 CE. Tyrian purple dye from Constantinople, also known as royal or imperial purple, from the Murex sea snail. Possibly first used by the Phoenicians as early as 1600 BCE. Greatly prized for its fade-resistance, brighting with use. Twelve thousand snails yielded only .05 ounces of dye. The sack of Constantinople in 1204 ended the use of this expensive dye in the west and royalty turned to vermillion. Paris, Musée National du Moyen Âge.

Fränkische Frau aus Frei-Weinheim

Fränkische Frau aus Frei-Weinheim

ingelheimer-geschichte.de

La reproducción de la fíbula del "tesoro de Domagnano" del Museo de Nüremberg, en fase de elaboración.

El Ulfiliano, ese alfabeto ideado por el obispo Ulfilas o Wulfilas para evangelizar a los godos.

Map of Charlemagne's empire, 768-843. Charlemagne, a.k.a Charles the Great or Charles I, was king of the Franks from 768, king of the Lombards from 774, and was crowned emperor in 800. Charlemagne died in 814 and was succeeded by his only surviving son, Louis I. Louis's death in 840 was followed by civil war between his three sons, which resulted in the split (and the end) of the empire in three parts in 843.

Square Pyramidal Bell, 6th-7th centuries (?), made in Niederbreisig, Frankish (?), Copper alloy; Dimensions: Overall: 1 1/2 x 1 1/2 x 1 1/8 in. (3.8 x 3.8 x 2.8 cm)

Cylindrical Pendant, 6th-7th centuries, made in Niederbreisig, Frankish, Bone; Dimensions: Overall: 1 5/16 x 3/8 in. (3.3 x 1 cm)

Cylindrical Pendant | Frankish | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Back to Saxon (AD 450 - 1066) Title: Saxon biconical jar Description: Biconical jar of buff sandy ware. This jar has been wheelthrown. It has two zones of stamped decoration separated by cordon on its upper body. The base is flat and roughly cut off. This jar was imported from the Frankish areas of what is now northern France and Belgium.

Welcome to Museum of London Images

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Frankish Warrior - 500s AD by Angus McBride. From the Germanic Warrior book in the Man-at-Arms series

germanicwarrior236568ad100ve

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Earring. Date: 6th–7th century. Geography: Made in probably Italy. Culture: Byzantine or Langobardic. Medium: Gold.

Glass drinking horn, Italy, ca. 576-625, Metropolitan Museum of Art collection

The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Glass Drinking Horn

metmuseum.org

Burial rites of Five Appliqués in the Shape of a Cross, ca. 600 Langobardic; From Castel Trosino, central Italy Gold