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In 1900, Sir Arthur Evans, at Knossus, on the island of Crete, found 3,000 clay tablets with writing he was never able to decipher. He labelled the writing Linear B, to differentiate from others previously found. In 1952, Michael Ventris, an amateur cryptologist, declare Linear B to be Archaic Greek, indicating the Greek language had a 3,300 year history, only Chinese probably older.

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4000 yr old Sumerian secret recipe for alcholic beverage ~ Cuneiform was created by the ancient Sumerians around 3500 B.C. Originally a nomadic people, Sumerians relocated to a stretch of land then dubbed 'The Fertile Crescent,' which comprises most of modern day Iraq and Iran. It would be another 400 years before the Egyptians would learn how to read and write on stone tablets. This link takes you to a site that translates Cuneiform

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Sumerian Tablet C.3100-BCE Uruk. It is easier to read Sumerian pictographs than Etruscan

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Sultanhani Monument at Ankara Museum Hittite monument with hieroglyphic inscription. The importance of this stele comes from the inscription written in Luwian language but Hittite hieroglyphs, instead of cuneiform script. Luwian Language was the lingua franca.

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Write your name in Elvish.

One thing to point out is that X isn't used in elvish (a KS is used). The C isn't really used either (the K and the S are find substitutes). Also there isn't a J, just a long G. It's a phonetic language so everything is spelled exactly as it sounds.

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Linear A - The Minoans developed the first written systems of Europe, the ornamental Cretan Hieroglyphs, and the stylized Linear A. Linear A is similar to Linear B, the writing system of Mycenaean Greeks. One major similarity to Linear B is the fact that most of the Linear A inscriptions are accounting lists of goods. One significant difference between Linear A and Linear B, however, is that Linear A was also used on personal objects for religious dedications.

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Clay tablet inscribed with six lines of Linear A writing Zakros, end of Late Minoan IB (ca. 1450 B.C.)

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Clay spheres from Mesopotamia could be the 'very first data storage'

5,500 years ago. A lost code used to keep records 200 years before the invention of the written word has been found in clay balls from Iran. The balls, also called ‘envelopes’, are hollow and contain different geometric shapes or ‘tokens'. These envelopes likely represent the known - at least to our current knowledge - efforts to humans to permanently record data.

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