Madeleine Chéruit

In 1912, Mme Chéruit signed a contract to collaborate with Lucien Vogel to produce his new fashion magazine, La Gazette du Bon Ton. Six other top Paris designers – Georges Doeuillet, Jacques Doucet, Jeanne Paquin, Paul Poiret, Redfern & Sons and the House of Charles Worth – joined the project. Mme Chéruit retired in 1923, and in 1935, shortly after the peak years of the Great Depression, Elsa Schiaparelli famously took over Chéruit's 98-room salon and work studios.


Madeleine Chéruit

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Day dress - c. 1895, by Gustave Beer - KCI

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Cheruit, sketch 035-058, fall 1920.

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Cheruit, sketch 036-016, fall 1920.

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"Le Jardin du Peyrou - Costume tailleur de Chéruit", Gazette du Bon Ton, 1913; MFA 2004.18.6

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Madeleine Chéruit, mother and children, 1913. Illustration by Pierre Brissaud.

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Wedding Dress Raudnitz and Co. - Huet and Chéruit  (French) Designer: Madeleine Chéruit (French, 1906–1935)

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“It is unthinkable for the breasts to be sealed up in solitary confinement in a fortress-like castle like the corset, as if to punish them,” wrote Paul Poiret—and so the figure was freed. The spurning of tight, confining undergarments happened as lighter, floatier, more diaphanous fabrics came into favor—like that seen here in a Chéruit design from 1928.

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Madeleine Chéruit, reception dress, 1913. Illustration by Pierre Brissaud.

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Man Ray, American Vogue, May 15 1925 (Chéruit)

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Très Parisien Fashion Print, October 1935, Chéruit (Madame Wormser)

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Chéruit (Madame Wormser) label, from 1910s silk tunic

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Chéruit (Madame Wormser) 1923 Evening Gown, Fashion Illustration Fromenti

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Dress (Ball Gown) Raudnitz and Co. - Huet and Chéruit  (French) Date: ca. 1905 Culture: French Medium: silk, linen Dimensions: Length at CB (a): 16 in. (40.6 cm) Length at CB (b): 59 in. (149.9 cm) Credit Line: Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Mrs. Robert G. Olmsted, 1965

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Marion Morehouse wearing a dress by Chéruit and jewelry by Black, Starr and Frost, next to a piano designed by Steichen, 1928. Steichen. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy Condé Nast Archive, New York. © 1928 Condé Nast Publications

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Chéruit 1929 Evening Gown, Jewels Art Deco, Fashion Illustration by Douglas Pollard

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Belle époque -summer dress by Chéruit

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Evening cape by Chéruit ca 1920 (back view)

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Raudnitz and Co. - Huet and Chéruit (French) Suit - ca. 1905

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Arletty, habillée par Chéruit et photographiée par Madame d’Ora, Paris, années 1920

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Madeleine Chéruit, dinner dress, illustration by Pierre Brissaud, published in La Gazette du Bon-Ton, 1912

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Wedding Dress Raudnitz and Co. - Huet and Chéruit  (French) Designer: Madeleine Chéruit (French, 1906–1935)

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La Fleur et Le Miroir (The Flower and the Mirror) - Robe du soir (Evening dress), by: Madame Madeleine Chéruit, Illustration by: Pierre Brissaud, published in: La Gazette du Bon-Ton, Volume 1, No. 2, December 1912

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Together at Last. Our curators spotted this unidentified Art Deco dress in an auction catalogue and knew just where it came from. They recognized it as a design from early 20th-century couturiere Madeleine Chéruit, but that’s not all—it matched a photograph in our collection. In the photo Marion Morehouse (who later became Mrs. E. E. Cummings) models the richly sequined chiffon dress. You can see both in the Art of the Americas Wing.

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Portrait of Mme. Cheruit Wearing a Fur Collar - Paul César Helleu

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This is how you feel reading Proust...going closer and closer and seeing the creative spirit. Chéruit's dress embroidery. Even closer? Click here (www.mymuseumoflon...)

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