HINDU GODS CHART There are four main sects within Hinduism: 1. Shaivism (in which Shiva is worshipped as the main god); 2. Vaishnavism (in which Vishnu worshipped as the main god); 3. Shaktism (in which the female aspects of god are primarily worshipped); and 4. Smartism (in which six main gods are worshipped: Shiva, Vishnu, Shakti, Ganesh, Murugan and Surya).

HINDU GODS CHART There are four main sects within Hinduism: 1. Shaivism (in which Shiva is worshipped as the main god); 2. Vaishnavism (in which Vishnu worshipped as the main god); 3. Shaktism (in which the female aspects of god are primarily worshipped); and 4. Smartism (in which six main gods are worshipped: Shiva, Vishnu, Shakti, Ganesh, Murugan and Surya).

Statue of Goddess Durga.  The word Shakti means divine energy/force/power, and Durga is the warrior aspect of the Divine Mother/Brahman(Supreme Absolute Godhead). As a goddess, Durga's feminine power contains the combined energies of all the gods. Each of her weapons was given to her by various gods: Rudra's trident, Vishnu's discus, Indra's thunderbolt, Brahma's kamandalu, Kuber's Ratnahar, etc. She is the entirety of the the life force.

Statue of Goddess Durga. The word Shakti means divine energy/force/power, and Durga is the warrior aspect of the Divine Mother/Brahman(Supreme Absolute Godhead). As a goddess, Durga's feminine power contains the combined energies of all the gods. Each of her weapons was given to her by various gods: Rudra's trident, Vishnu's discus, Indra's thunderbolt, Brahma's kamandalu, Kuber's Ratnahar, etc. She is the entirety of the the life force.

"An invisible red thread connects those destined to meet, regardless of time, place, or circumstances. The thread may stretch or tangle, but never break." ~Asian Proverb

"An invisible red thread connects those destined to meet, regardless of time, place, or circumstances. The thread may stretch or tangle, but never break." ~Asian Proverb

Saint Martin de Porres (December 9, 1579 – November 3, 1639) was a lay brother of the Dominican Order. He is the patron saint of mixed-race people and all those seeking interracial harmony. Feast: 	November 3

Saint Martin de Porres (December 9, 1579 – November 3, 1639) was a lay brother of the Dominican Order. He is the patron saint of mixed-race people and all those seeking interracial harmony. Feast: November 3

Saint Rose of Viterbo, Franciscan Tertiary, pray for us and exiles and people rejected by religious orders..  Feast day September 4.

Saint Rose of Viterbo, Franciscan Tertiary, pray for us and exiles and people rejected by religious orders.. Feast day September 4.

St. Aelred, born 1110, feast day 1/12.  Sometimes called the gay saint.  Patron saint of Integrity USA, a gay organization associated with the Episcopal Church.

St. Aelred, born 1110, feast day 1/12. Sometimes called the gay saint. Patron saint of Integrity USA, a gay organization associated with the Episcopal Church.

Feast of St. Dominic (August 8): Patron Saint of Scientists and the Symbiotic Relationship between Faith and Science

Feast of St. Dominic (August 8): Patron Saint of Scientists and the Symbiotic Relationship between Faith and Science

A Rasta's deadlocks' length measures their wisdom, maturity, and knowledge- personal growth. Dreads indicate a Rasta's age, as well as represent their time as a Rastafarian. Growing dreadlocks is a personal journey based around learning human patience. In the Rastafarian Movement, not only is growing dreads a religious tradition, but the process encourages the human mind, soul, and spirituality to strain to the highest limits.

A Rasta's deadlocks' length measures their wisdom, maturity, and knowledge- personal growth. Dreads indicate a Rasta's age, as well as represent their time as a Rastafarian. Growing dreadlocks is a personal journey based around learning human patience. In the Rastafarian Movement, not only is growing dreads a religious tradition, but the process encourages the human mind, soul, and spirituality to strain to the highest limits.

In Norse mythology the Dísir are spirits described as "dead women" in grand attire who visit dreams.

In Norse mythology the Dísir are spirits described as "dead women" in grand attire who visit dreams.

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