Black people and Dress, 1915 to 1919

Collection by The Many Black Histories

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The Many Black Histories
1916

Portrett, mann av afrikansk opprinnelse, Demetric Guimaraes.

Norsk Folkemuseum - Photographer Borgen, Gustav

Mabel Mercer in a tuxedo, 1917.

Mabel Mercer in a tuxedo

One of hundreds of thousands of free digital items from The New York Public Library.

Date Issued: 1916 Place Term: Philadelphia Publisher: F.A. Davis Company

A typical family group.

One of hundreds of thousands of free digital items from The New York Public Library.

Young African American woman seated wearing a white cotton blouse and skirt with a dark fur stole around her shoulders. c1915

African American Woman

Young African American woman seated wearing a white cotton blouse and skirt with a dark fur stole around her shoulders. c1915 Want to know more about Black History ? Visit Discover Black Heritage.

This photo was taken in Washington, D.C. in 1916 at the “Convention of Former Slaves."   Pictured from left to right: Annie Parram, age 104; Anna Angales, age 105; Elizabeth Berkeley, 125; Sadie Thompson, 110.

This photo was taken in Washington, D.C. in 1916 at the “Convention of Former Slaves." Pictured from left to right: Annie Parram, age 104; Anna Angales, age 105; Elizabeth Berkeley, 125; Sadie Thompson, 110.

Mrs. William H. Holtzclaw. 1915

Mrs. William H. Holtzclaw.

One of hundreds of thousands of free digital items from The New York Public Library.

Mercedes Alice Anderson, Regina Andrews' sister

Mercedes Alice Anderson, Regina Andrews' sister

One of hundreds of thousands of free digital items from The New York Public Library.

Industrial Nights #DS_10scja    Photographer: W. H. Bass. Photographs and Prints Division, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library. Over 400,000 African Americans migrated from the South between 1916 and 1918, at an average rate of sixteen thousand per month, or five hundred per day. In urban centers, segregated "industrial nights" allowed men to find employment.

Industrial Nights #DS_10scja Photographer: W. H. Bass. Photographs and Prints Division, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library. Over 400,000 African Americans migrated from the South between 1916 and 1918, at an average rate of sixteen thousand per month, or five hundred per day. In urban centers, segregated "industrial nights" allowed men to find employment.