Niagara Falls Underground Railroad

Niagara Falls Underground Railroad

niagarafallsundergroundrailroad.org
Niagara Falls, New York / The Niagara Falls Underground Railroad Heritage Area celebrates, interprets and preserves the places and stories associated with the Underground Railroad in NF.
Niagara Falls Underground Railroad
More ideas from Niagara Falls
Investigate one of the most ingenious escapes in American History with Henry’s Freedom Box by Ellen Levine. Students will be in awe of Henry Brown’s daring attempt to travel from Virginia to Pennsylvania in a box less than 3 x 3 x 3 — via express mail! Use Levine’s picture book to spark vigorous online research to discover more facts about Brown and his journey. Use this New York Times article to inspire a genuine interest in primary source documents such as the “eyewitness account from the…

Henrys Freedom Box: A True Story from the Underground Railroad: Ellen Levine, Kadir Nelson: Non-fiction Picture Book. Boy named Henry mails himself to freedom. Teach about civil war history.

Digital Story: Secrets and Codes of the Underground Railroad - Youtube

African Americans prepare cotton for a cotton gin on Smith’s plantation, Port Royal Island, South Carolina, in (AP Photo/Library of Congress/Timothy H. O’Sullivan)

WOften, the slaveowner would entertain his friends by forcing the enslaved Blacks to have orgies–multiple pairings of slaves having sex in front of them. And the white men often would participate in the debauchery.

The fertility of enslaved women was examined by owners to make sure they were able to birth as many children as possible. Secretly, slaveowners would impregnate enslaved women and when the child was born and

Caroline V. Still Anderson, daughter of noted abolitionist William Still who wrote the Underground Railroad, was one of this country's pioneer black female physicians, prominent in many educational and civic activities.

Caroline V. Still Anderson, daughter of noted abolitionist William Still who wrote the Underground Railroad, was one of this country's pioneer black female physicians, prominent in many educational and civic activities.

Josiah Henson was born into slavery June 15, 1789, in Port Tobacco, Maryland. In 1828, Henson became a preacher for the Methodist Episcopal Church and was able to earn money to buy his freedom. His master took the money, but then raised the price to $1,000. In 1830 Henson fled to Canada with his family where he became involved in the Underground Railroad, leading over 200 slaves to freedom

Escaped slave and minister Josiah Henson became involved in the Underground Railroad, leading slaves to freedom and developed his own Afro-Canadian community.

Frederick Douglass' wife Anna Murray Douglass. Although never credited as an editor, Anna helped run Douglass' newspaper while he traveled on speaking engagements to garner support for the antislavery cause.

Anna Murray-Douglass – was an American abolitionist, member of the Underground Railroad, and the first wife of American social reformer and statesman Frederick Douglass, who Murray encouraged and helped escape slavery.

Tice Davids, a runaway slave from Kentucky, was the inspiration for the first usage of the term “Underground Railroad.” When he swam across the Ohio River to freedom, his former owner assumed he’d drowned and told the local paper if Davids had escaped, he must have traveled on "an underground railroad." (Davids actually made it alive and well.)

In Tice Davids, a runaway slave, fled from his owner in Kentucky. Davids swam across the Ohio River with his owner in close pursuit in a boat. Davids reached the Ohio shore at the

Sara Lucy Bagby Johnson(1833-1906) was the last known 'fugitive slave' in U.S. history. Lucy escaped via the Underground Railroad to PA then on to Cleveland, Ohio. Her owner, William Goshorn(WV), eventually located her, and she was returned under the provisions of the Fugitive Slave Law. One can only imagine what she went through. She was eventually saved by a Union Captain around the time period of the execution of Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. Exact date is unknown.

Sara Lucy Bagby was the last known 'fugitive slave' in U. Lucy escaped via the Underground Railroad to PA then on to Cleveland, Ohio. Her owner, William Goshorn(WV), eventually located her, and she was returned under the prov

The Underground Railroad - blog post shows how slaves were hidden in a wagon and photos of Levi Coffin's home

A few days ago, I walked in the long-forgotten footsteps of runaway slaves. My feet touched the same smooth ash floorboards as theirs.