Keukegen- Japanese folklore: a creature covered in black fur that lives in peoples houses. Its name means "rarely seen". It was a disease spirit, inflicting sickness into those who lived in its host house.

Keukegen- Japanese folklore: a creature covered in black fur that lives in peoples houses. Its name means "rarely seen". It was a disease spirit, inflicting sickness into those who lived in its host house.

Kappa Girl, Yokai, Lake Spirit, Japanese Art, Asian Style 4x6 Fine Art Print

Kappa Girl, Yokai, Lake Spirit, Japanese Art, Asian Style 4x6 Fine Art Print

Three jizo - 地蔵  Jizo are bodhisattva who looks over children, travellers and the underworld

Three jizo - 地蔵 Jizo are bodhisattva who looks over children, travellers and the underworld

A Kappa is a dwarf-like water demon of Japan that resemble shrivelled old-men, with webbed hands and feet, sporting a tortoise shell. An origin for the demons could be they are the ghosts of drowned souls. Any pond or river may have one. They possess immense strength and can easily overpower a human. Although the source of this power comes from the stored water within the dish on their head.

A Kappa is a dwarf-like water demon of Japan that resemble shrivelled old-men, with webbed hands and feet, sporting a tortoise shell. An origin for the demons could be they are the ghosts of drowned souls. Any pond or river may have one. They possess immense strength and can easily overpower a human. Although the source of this power comes from the stored water within the dish on their head.

Chang’e or Chang-o [嫦娥] is the Chinese goddess of the Moon. Unlike many lunar deities in other cultures who personify the Moon, Chang’e only lives on the Moon. In one version of the Chang’e legend, she was a beautiful young girl working in the Jade Emperor’s palace in heaven, where immortals, good people and fairies lived. One day, she accidentally broke a precious porcelain jar. Angered, the Jade Emperor banished her to live on earth. #myth

Chang’e or Chang-o [嫦娥] is the Chinese goddess of the Moon. Unlike many lunar deities in other cultures who personify the Moon, Chang’e only lives on the Moon. In one version of the Chang’e legend, she was a beautiful young girl working in the Jade Emperor’s palace in heaven, where immortals, good people and fairies lived. One day, she accidentally broke a precious porcelain jar. Angered, the Jade Emperor banished her to live on earth. #myth

KAGUYA HIME (Princess Kaguya), the main character in The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter, said to be the oldest Japanese folktale

KAGUYA HIME (Princess Kaguya), the main character in The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter, said to be the oldest Japanese folktale

Umibōzu is a spirit in Japanese folklore. The Umibōzu is said to live in the ocean and capsize the ship of anyone who dares speak to it. This spirit’s name, which combines the character for “sea” with the character of “Buddhist monk,” is possibly related to the fact that the Umibōzu is said to have a large, round head, resembling the shaven heads of Buddhist monks. Alternatively, they are enormous Yōkai (spectres) that appear to shipwreck victims and fishermen.

Umibōzu is a spirit in Japanese folklore. The Umibōzu is said to live in the ocean and capsize the ship of anyone who dares speak to it. This spirit’s name, which combines the character for “sea” with the character of “Buddhist monk,” is possibly related to the fact that the Umibōzu is said to have a large, round head, resembling the shaven heads of Buddhist monks. Alternatively, they are enormous Yōkai (spectres) that appear to shipwreck victims and fishermen.

The Moon rabbit in folklore is a rabbit that lives on the moon, based on pareidolia that identifies the markings of the moon as a rabbit. The story exists in many cultures, particularly in Aztec mythology and East Asian folklore, where it is seen pounding in a mortar and pestle. In Chinese folklore, it is often portrayed as a companion of the moon goddess Chang'e, constantly pounding the elixir of life for her.

The Moon rabbit in folklore is a rabbit that lives on the moon, based on pareidolia that identifies the markings of the moon as a rabbit. The story exists in many cultures, particularly in Aztec mythology and East Asian folklore, where it is seen pounding in a mortar and pestle. In Chinese folklore, it is often portrayed as a companion of the moon goddess Chang'e, constantly pounding the elixir of life for her.

針女子 (Barbed Woman)  Harionago is a frightening female ghoul said to be extremely beautiful. She has extremely long hair tipped with thorn-like barbs which are directly under her control. Wandering around Ehime, Shikoku, it has been said that when she sees a young man, she laughs and when he laughs with her, she will attack him.

針女子 (Barbed Woman) Harionago is a frightening female ghoul said to be extremely beautiful. She has extremely long hair tipped with thorn-like barbs which are directly under her control. Wandering around Ehime, Shikoku, it has been said that when she sees a young man, she laughs and when he laughs with her, she will attack him.

Pinterest
Search