Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas

Green Man: A symbol of rebirth, or "renaissance," representing the cycle of growth each spring; a Green man is represented as a man with foliage making up his face and sometimes body.

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Green Man – Summer | Ryszard Zarebski

rysart.co.uk

Frigga is a Norse Goddess. She is the wife of Odin, and ruler over love, birth, marriage, destiny, and the sky. She weaves the sky and fates, and is considered responsible for the fertility of crops (due to the rain and sun from the sky). She is considered the “All mother

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The North Wind's daughter

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Mother's Love: 44 Days of Witchery, Day 7: Air Element

motherslovejewelry.blogspot.com

Svjatogor by Petar Meseldžija. Titanic hero-warrior in Russian mythology and folklore. A giant living in the Holy Mountains after which he is named, he and his mighty steed are so large that, when they ride forth, the crest of his helmet sweeps away the clouds. Svyatogor is the eldest of Russia’s bogatyri, and in many ways he is the saddest. His days of glory are long behind him, and he is depicted in most epic poems as an old, tired warrior, doomed to fade away.

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Myths & Legends: Rusalka In Slavic folklore, there exists a dangerous female fairy-like being that lives in lakes and rivers. Though often confused with mermaids and sometimes are portrayed to look similar to mermaids, they are traditionally not mermaid-like in appearance. They are beautiful and seductive woman with eerie, green-glowing eyes. According to legend, the rusalki are the spirits of drowned or violently murdered young girls. They take delight in drowning men and children

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From deep under the very ground on which we innocently, blithly, nay ~ naively stroll...m'dears? A Troll.

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In Norse mythology, svartálfar (Old Norse "black elves", singular svartálfr) are beings who dwell in Svartálf[a]heimr (anglicized as Svartalfheim, "home of black-elves").[1] Both the svartálfar and Svartálfaheimr are primarily attested in the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. Scholars have noted that the svartálfar appear to be synonymous with dwarfs and potentially also the dökkálfar (Old Norse "dark elves").

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She has no idea of her strength .....

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Catrin Welz-Stein

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Agnieszka Jopkiewicz/ Medusa hair.

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Greek Myth: A Gorgon

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