There’s more to see...
Sign up to discover and save different things to try in 2015.

Eric Lafforgue


Eric Lafforgue

  • 42 Pins

Boy with a feather in the hair, Malekula island, Vanuatu, via Flickr.

Surma warrior with scarifications - Ethiopia by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr Men , like women, also have some scarifications on their body. It is a beauty sign for women , for men, it tells the fights he made.

Sandals on a trunk, Khor Angar, Djibouti by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

Masai warriors jumping during a dance - Kenya by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

  • Q-Sphere Team
    Q-Sphere Team

    Masais (or massais) warriors jumping, Nkama village, Kenya. Many people in Kenya (local ones) told me that Masais will no longer exist in the next years, as they live in the most touristic area. The Masais meet a lot of foreigners, and even if most of them have now a mobile phone, and use MPesa (mobile paiement), they still live in mud houses, and their cattle is their only wealth.

Zamda an albino girl and her mother's hands, Tanzania by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

  • Q-Sphere Team
    Q-Sphere Team

    This little albino girl is called Zamda, she lives in the village of Mikindani, in south tanzania. Before going there i read some very sad and cruel stories about albinos people in Tanzania. Many are killed, as witchdoctors use and sell some hair, nails, and even parts of their bodies to fight djinns (devils)... So when i met Zamda i was happy to see that she was well treated, even if she has lot of skin problems as you can see on her face.

Veiled girls at Nungwi beach, Zanzibar, Tanzania by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

Pushed away by their neighbours, Rendille henceforth inhabit a vast territory in one of Kenya's most arid regions: the Kaisut Desert. It is located between Lake Turkana and the Chalbi Desert. They are semi-nomadic, both nomad and pastoralist. Clans live in temporary settlement called gobs. Gobs are usually near wells dug and are given the name of the clan, subclan or the elder of the family. They never stay long at the same place to look for water sources and pasturing areas.

  • Q-Sphere Team
    Q-Sphere Team

    They have to move 3 to 5 times a year. Villages are typically made of two dozen houses with about 120 individuals. They are composed of a group of semi-spherical huts made of branches and covered with leather or canvas. Women are in charge of taking the houses apart and putting them back in the new location. Near them, an enclosure of crabbed branches protects camels for the night. Each kind of livestock (camels, sheep, goats, cattle) have a separate camp that is taken cared of by people of a different age-set. Un

Papua New Guinea Huli wigman by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

Family in front of a hungry panther, Tokyo, Japan by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

The Intore dancers have been active poachers for centuries, they have an amazing traditional dance, using headresses that go up in the sky. The dances are about the gorillas who live very close to the villages. The local people told me that there are both tutsi and hutu in the dancers. Fot those who like technical infos, the picture has this strange mood cos i took it at Aperture:f/1.2. Thanks to digital you can take 100 before having the right focus!

Papua New Guinea - nose ring decoration by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

  • Q-Sphere Team
    Q-Sphere Team

    No photoshop on this pic! papua new guinea >Leica 75mm/Velvia50 at 100iso colors

Omo Masalai tribe from Simbu / Chimbu Skeletons tribe, from Papua New Guinea. All the make up of those tribe was made to frighten the ennemies... I imagine that at night, in a forest, this may works well! Papua New Guinea , Highlands, Mount Hagen festival singsing

Small boat in the sea, Dahlak islands, Eritrea by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

Japanese pupil, Tokyo Japan by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

  • Q-Sphere Team
    Q-Sphere Team

    I like very much the attitude: this little schoolgirl wanted to do the V sign, that every japanese people does when someone takes a pix, but she was too young to achieve the V sign, and instead of that, made a kind of "i have to think about this problem" sign like The Rodin 's penseur...Sensoji,Tokyo ,Japan

Papua New Guinea - child by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

Donga fighting warning - Omo Ethiopia by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

  • Q-Sphere Team
    Q-Sphere Team

    If you want to see and take pictures during a Donga stick fighting in Surma tribes, you first need to have the approval of the big chief. It is not a problem to get it. You are supposed to be free to take pictures of the men, not the girls. But after liters of beers, the fighters become rather agressive and it is time to leave the place! Even the kids imitate the adults, like on the picture!

Afar girl smiling, Danakil desert, Ethiopia by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

  • Q-Sphere Team
    Q-Sphere Team

    A young afar girl, not yet married, cos you can see her hair. Later (but not too much), she'll marry her cousin. As many young girls, she may be infibulated...So the wedding night will start with a knife... That's the way some afars still do. The afars live in a triangle between Ethiopia, Eritrea and Djibouti. Few years ago, they asked for independance, and war took place...Now, they have a special district in Ethiopia, but tensions are still fight with Oromo people.

Dassanech girl with caps wig - Omorate Ethiopia by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

Mass Games Arirang in May Day Stadium - Pyongyang North Korea by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

Old one eyed Borana woman by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

  • Q-Sphere Team
    Q-Sphere Team

    In South Ethiopia, you do not see many old people in villages as life is hard..no doctors, no help, few NGO... So people do not live for long and have many health problems: malaria, eyes infections, like this old Borana woman. many tribes , when they see white people think we are doctors and ask for medicine. In many countries i had this experience. On this tour, we had one doctor with us, he gave treatments to a little kid who had an open wound to a foot. The kid showed no pain...

Oxen pulling a cart carrying fish out of the boats, Myanmar by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

Old Himba woman, Angola by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

Daasanach tribe girl - Omorate Ethiopia by Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

  • Q-Sphere Team
    Q-Sphere Team

    I came back to Omorate village, on the left side of the Omo river. Always the same old trunks to cross the river, fearing to fall in the water with all the cameras ans lenses!...always the same dirty village full of all kind of shits everywhere...but so nice people to meet. The Daasanach people collect the caps of the Coca and beers in the bars of Omorate and make wigs with them. Soon, there will be a bridge on Omo river, so thousands of people, cars, trucks, will pass the Dassanech villages. I felt i saw the last traditional times of this tribe.The Dassaneth or Geleb are living on both sides of the Omo river. The Dassanetch are originally nomadic pastoralists . However, despite their dedication to cattle rearing current reality reveals that crop cultivation on the flooded banks of the Omo river and its delta are fundamental to their subsistence. Omoratte market of the Dassanetch has been serving for centuries as an important trading center of the Karo and the Geleb where the Karo head

Mucubal Girl With Headscarf, Virie Area, Angola © Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr

Mursi kid - Ethiopia © Eric Lafforgue, via Flickr