War is hell. Vietnam

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Frederick Douglass

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Julia Ward Howe - Most known for her song, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” What many do not know about her is that she played a significant role in the women’s suffrage movement, helping to found the New England Women’s Club, the American Woman Suffrage Association, the Massachusetts Woman Suffrage Association and the New England Suffrage Association.

Education & Resources - National Women's History Museum - NWHM

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Jimi Hendrix with his mother Lucille Jeter ~

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Nicodemus was settled in 1877, and is the only surviving all-black settlement west of the Mississippi that was settled by former slaves during the Exoduster period after the Civil War. It is now a historic site administered by the National Parks Service.

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Archer Alexander served as the model for the newly emancipated slave kneeling before Lincoln in the sculpture Freedom's Memorial in Washington, D.C. He was enslaved by James Hollman, a farmer in Missouri. During the Civil War, Alexander escaped and fled to St. Louis, where he was befriended by William Greenleaf Eliot, a Unitarian minister and the founder of Washington University. Eliot managed to keep him hidden until Jan 1865, when all slaves in Missouri were manumitted. Missouri History Mu...

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From the UK Guardian, "How the end of slavery led to starvation and death for millions of Black Americans: In the brutal chaos that followed the civil war, life after emancipation was harsh and often short, new book argues," by Paul Harris New York, on 16 June 2012. Downs's book is full of terrible vignettes about the individual experiences of slave families who embraced their freedom from the brutal plantations on which they had been born or sold to.

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Druella Jones or "Aunt Jonas," Alabama, 1915 age 94. "She and two others were the only old slaves I found who were not loyal to their owners. During the [civil] war she tried to burn her master's house"

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After the Civil War, some former slaves/daughters of former slaves went to a "training school to become wives and mothers." Baton Rouge. LA. 1888.

Joanna P. Moore, 1832-1916. "In Christ's Stead": Autobiographical Sketches.

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:::::::::::: Antique Photograph :::::::::::: Carte de visite by Morse of Huntsville, Ala., and Nashville, Tenn. A slave or freedwoman sitting with her hands folded. This is a wonderful photograph.

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1860 -1900 (17)..A beautiful image of a one room colored school in Fruit Cove, FL....SLAVES, EX-SLAVES, and CHILDREN OF SLAVES IN THE AMERICAN SOUTH, sometime between mid to late 1870s-1880s

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Anna Murray-Douglass (1813–1882) was an American abolitionist, member of the underground railroad, and the first wife of American social reformer, Republican, and statesman Frederick Douglass, from 1838 to her death.

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Lucy Terry Prince, often called simply Lucy Terry, (c. 1730–1821) wrote the oldest known work of literature by an African American. She was stolen from Africa & sold into slavery as a baby to Ebenezer Wells of Deerfield, MA. He allowed her to be baptized into the Christian faith at 5 years old during the Great Awakening. A successful free black man,Abijah Prince, purchased her freedom & married her in 1756. In 1764, they moved to Guilford, Vt, & had 6 kids. 1, Cesar, was a Revolutionary War ...

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Oakland Plantation, situated on a bluff overlooking the Cape Fear River in Bladen County, North Carolina, was built over 200 years ago by General Thomas Brown, an American Revolutionary War patriot. It is one of a few houses of its period in North Carolina still being used today. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oakland_Plantation_%28Carvers,_North_Carolina%29 f

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These are fugitives slave escaping to the NORTH - 1860

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Ruins of Richmond & Petersburg railroad bridge, James River | April 1865 | Alexander Gardner, photographer | Library of Congress

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:::::::::: VIntage Photograph :::::::::: Two African American sisters with large bows in their hair and sweet expressions.

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Late 1800s Tintype Portrait of African American Couple

Late 1800s Tintype Portrait of African American Couple

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TRIP DOWN MEMORY LANE: ELIZABETH KECKLEY: A FREED SLAVE AND THE FIRST FEMALE BLACK FASHION DESIGNER IN WHITE HOUSE

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Thomas Mundy Peterson, first African American to vote, March 31, 1870.

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A HERO: Oseola McCarty worked all her life cleaning other women's houses. She lived very frugally, and from her savings, donated $150,000 to the University of Southern Mississippi for scholarship. “I want to help somebody’s child go to college,” she said. “I’m giving it away so that the children won’t have to work so hard, like I did.”

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Langston Hughes and Dorothy West traveling to Russia, 1933

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Powerful photo of Harry Belafonte & Coretta Scott King at Dr King's funeral, Atlanta, Georgia, 1968

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Raymond and Rosa Parks married 45 years.

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Frederick Douglass in 1848 at age 30.

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