Santeria


Santeria

  • 271 Pins

Kuan Yin Goddess of Compassion

Kuan Yin Goddess of Compassion

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Oshun dice...

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Blessed Yemaya

Yemaya Photo by Tonkida | Photobucket

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Ochun Drawing, Illustration, Painting by Luis Bencomo

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The true queen Isis, Egyptian Goddess of Magic and Giver of Life Isis, the Egyptian goddess of rebirth remains one of the most familiar images of empowered and utter femininity. The goddess of Orion & Sirian origins,is the mother of today's humanity and she's still adored by humanity.

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Oggun❤

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OKÊ ARÔ OXOSSI by Bicho Solto Sagaz, via Flickr

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What does Oya teach us? She teaches us that death is a natural and normal process that we go through during our lives. She teaches us that not only is change inevitable but it also who and what we are. We are never the same. We are dynamic beings that are ever evolving.The Goddess of Transformation urges us to die to the old in order to step into the new lives that we desire.

The Goddess of Transformation

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Oshun, West African goddess/orisha of sweet waters, beauty, love, artistry, and prosperity.

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Oshun is a Yoruba Orisha who reigns over love, intimacy, beauty, wealth and diplomacy.

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Este Hogar es

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Mo religion es parte de mi esencia

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Yemaya

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YEMAYA CAKE

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ELEGUA CAKE

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Crow Tarot Card by Ray4359

Crow Tarot Card by Ray4359 on deviantART

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Oya. In Yoruba mythology, Oya (Alternative spellings: Oiá, Iansã, Iansan), is the Undergoddess of the Niger River. Oya has been combined in Santería with the Catholic images of the Virgin of Candelaria.

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Ochun rumba

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Oya. In Yoruba mythology, Oya (Alternative spellings: Oiá, Iansã, Iansan), is the Undergoddess of the Niger River. Oya has been combined in Santería with the Catholic images of the Virgin of Candelaria.

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Cuban Royal Palm (no 3) - Cuba's national tree - maybe useful as metaphor in the design

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Tamboreros Santeria

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LARÓYÈ EXU by Bicho Solto Sagaz, via Flickr

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Africa | House of the Head Shrine (Ile-Ori) | | Throughout Yorubaland, a person venerates his or her ori-inu ("inner head"), a personal spirit that guides an individual's destiny. The symbol of the inner head is a small conical object, which is in turn secreted in a larger container with a conical lid called ile-ore, literally, "house of the head." The ile-ori which serves as a shrine to the ori-inu, is made from leather, cloth and covered with beads and/or cowrie shells

“House of the Head” shrine (ile-ori)

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Oshun and Child

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