Today in History

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May 18, 1852: Pictorialist photographer Gertrude Käsebier is born. This is her photo of Sioux Indian child Mary Lone Bear.

May Pictorialist Photographer Gertrude Käsebier Is Born. This Is Her Photo Of Sioux Indian Child Mary Lone Bear.

March 21, 1965: Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and followers begin their march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. Learn about Diane Nash's role.

Vivian, Diane Nash, and sit-in leaders confront Mayor Ben West on the Courthouse steps, Nashville,

March 9, 1913: Florence Hedges writes to her dad about her experiences marching in the 1913 Woman Suffrage parade in Washington, DC. On the day before the presidential inauguration, more than 5,000 women marched up Pennsylvania Avenue demanding the right to vote.

March Florence Hedges writes to her dad about her experiences marching in the 1913 Woman Suffrage parade in Washington, DC. On the day before the presidential inauguration, more than women marched up Pennsylvania Avenue demanding the right to vote.

Happy National Doughnut Day! In this photo, General Eisenhower poses with a Salvation Army Donut Girl and donuts. (Sally L. Steinberg Collection of Doughnut Ephemera, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.)

In this photo, General Eisenhower poses with a Salvation Army Donut Girl and donuts. (Sally L. Steinberg Collection of Doughnut Ephemera, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.

June 13, 1898: Mary Stow dies. She embroidered this patriotic quilt, which commemorates the 1876 Centennial in Philadelphia, a World's Fair.

She embroidered this patriotic quilt, which commemorates the 1876 Centennial in Philadelphia, a World's Fair.

May 27, 1937: The Golden Gate Bridge opens. This photo was taken by Ansel Adams in 1932, before the bridge's construction started.

An original Ansel Adams photograph showing a San Francisco scene that hasn't existed in nearly 85 years is hitting the auction block for the first time.

March 25, 1911: The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City kills 146 immigrant women workers. A major landmark in employment safety.

This picture shows how the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire was a major landmark in employment safety as it was a catalyst in the women labor movement and American labor history.

June 16, 1933: President Roosevelt opens the New Deal recovery program. One of the New Deal's most successful programs involved bringing electric power to rural America.

Mamer Rural Electrification Administration Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.

The blizzard of March 1888 was no joke! Wall Street bankers and financiers survey the damage. Courtesy of New York Historical Society.

The blizzard of March 1888 was no joke! Wall Street bankers and financiers survey the damage. Courtesy of New York Historical Society.

May 10, 1869: First transcontinental railroad completed, joining the east and west rails at Promontory, Utah. A national network of iron, steel, and steam, represented by the driving of the Golden Spike, became a unifying metaphor in the years after the Civil War. Traveling west with his mother in June 1869, eight-year-old Hart F. Farwell stopped at Promontory to cut a chip from a special railroad tie.

Wooden chip cut from a railroad tie, Promontory, Utah, 1869

Twice recaptured, this Civil War sword changed hands on today's date (March 10) in 1864.

Twice recaptured, this Civil War sword changed hands on today's date (March in

March 9, 1959: The first Barbie doll goes on display in New York City. 1962 lunch box.

Today in The first Barbie doll goes on display in New York City. This is a 1962 lunch box.

"The right of citizens...to vote shall not be denied...on account of sex."   August 26, 1920: 19th amendment goes into effect. This is the pen used by Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby to sign the certificate of ratification of the 19th amendment on August 26, 1920, giving women the right to vote.

August amendment goes into effect. This is the pen used by Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby to sign the certificate of ratification of the amendment on August giving women the right to vote.

April 29, 1899: Happy birthday, Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington! Born here in Washington, D.C., the pianist, composer, and orchestra leader had a huge, international impact on jazz. This is a 1963 program for his performance in Damascus, Syria.

April 29, 1899: Happy birthday, Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington! Born here in Washington, D.C., the pianist, composer, and orchestra leader had a huge, international impact on jazz. This is a 1963 program for his performance in Damascus, Syria.

What was it like to be a young voter in the 19th century? The New York Times puts it like this: "Democracy smelled like oil-torches flickering at midnight parades. It tasted like barbecue straight from the hog and whiskey straight from the barrel. It sounded like boys building bonfires, girls practicing serenades and stump speakers shouting over one another." Sounds like a party, right? Join us on Saturday, June 18, 2016, to party like it's 1899.

The National Museum of American History and BYT Present: We The Party People!

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