DATE TAKEN  1890s  TITLE  Seiberling Mansion  DESCRIPTION  Elegant brick Victorian mansion constructed by industrialist Monroe Seiberling during Indiana's Gas Boom. Later the home of George Kingston, developer and manufacturer of the Kingston carburetor and other components used by early auto manufacturers. In 1946, it was acquired by Indiana University and became the first home of IU-Kokomo.  Indiana

DATE TAKEN 1890s TITLE Seiberling Mansion DESCRIPTION Elegant brick Victorian mansion constructed by industrialist Monroe Seiberling during Indiana's Gas Boom. Later the home of George Kingston, developer and manufacturer of the Kingston carburetor and other components used by early auto manufacturers. In 1946, it was acquired by Indiana University and became the first home of IU-Kokomo. Indiana

DATE TAKEN  1890s  TITLE  Seiberling Carriage House viewed from Sycamore St.  DESCRIPTION  The carriage house has changed dramatically over the years, as it went from horse-drawn carriages to motorized vehicles. through a series of private owners, then to IU-Kokomo and on to Howard County and the Historical Society. Kokomo, Indiana

DATE TAKEN 1890s TITLE Seiberling Carriage House viewed from Sycamore St. DESCRIPTION The carriage house has changed dramatically over the years, as it went from horse-drawn carriages to motorized vehicles. through a series of private owners, then to IU-Kokomo and on to Howard County and the Historical Society. Kokomo, Indiana

Regulation wagon, ca. 1895 - A uniformed driver sits atop a regulation wagon in Boston, Massachusetts, circa 1895. Regulation wagons were used to transport mail between Post Offices, their stations, and train stations in large cities from the 1870s to the early 1900s. The wagon pictured here was painted red, white, and blue, with gold lettering, and could haul up to 5,000 pounds of mail. By the late 1890s regulation wagons began to be phased out in favor of lighter and cheaper screen wagons.

Regulation wagon, ca. 1895 - A uniformed driver sits atop a regulation wagon in Boston, Massachusetts, circa 1895. Regulation wagons were used to transport mail between Post Offices, their stations, and train stations in large cities from the 1870s to the early 1900s. The wagon pictured here was painted red, white, and blue, with gold lettering, and could haul up to 5,000 pounds of mail. By the late 1890s regulation wagons began to be phased out in favor of lighter and cheaper screen wagons.

An Ohio River Railroad passenger train is seen here at the Huntington, West Virginia station circa 1895. Note the ORRR's name on the side of both the passenger and freight stations. This town marked the southern terminus of this railroad and in just a few years it was taken over by the B.

An Ohio River Railroad passenger train is seen here at the Huntington, West Virginia station circa 1895. Note the ORRR's name on the side of both the passenger and freight stations. This town marked the southern terminus of this railroad and in just a few years it was taken over by the B.

Stacking hay at Free’s farm, near Warwick, Queensland, 1894. Large wagon-load of hay, drawn by horses. The hay is being piled into the stack building. NOV 1894.

Stacking hay at Free’s farm, near Warwick, Queensland, 1894. Large wagon-load of hay, drawn by horses. The hay is being piled into the stack building. NOV 1894.

This photo is from the first performance of The Nutcracker in 1892. The ballet's themes of innocence and childhood especially resonate with American audiences.  The Nutcracker ballet spread beyond Russia’s borders and was performed in the great capitals of Europe. The first full-length American performance didn’t take place until 1944, in San Francisco. Since then, Americans have come to love The Nutcracker and treasure it as a holiday tradition, more so than any other country

This photo is from the first performance of The Nutcracker in 1892. The ballet's themes of innocence and childhood especially resonate with American audiences. The Nutcracker ballet spread beyond Russia’s borders and was performed in the great capitals of Europe. The first full-length American performance didn’t take place until 1944, in San Francisco. Since then, Americans have come to love The Nutcracker and treasure it as a holiday tradition, more so than any other country

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