Amy Stacey Curtis

Amy Stacey Curtis

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I'm 17 years into an 18-year art project, 9 solo-biennial exhibits of interactive installation in Maine's empty mill spaces. http://www.amystaceycurtis.com
Amy Stacey Curtis
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In I Gotta Have Faith, installation artist Amy Stacey Curtis writes about how faith (that it will all work out) is a big part of her 18-year solo-biennial process in Maine's mills.

In I Gotta Have Faith, installation artist Amy Stacey Curtis writes about how faith (that it will all work out) is a big part of her solo-biennial process in Maine's mills.

Artist Amy Stacey Curtis writes about the most difficult of 9 walks she's taken since 2003--my 9-hour, 90-foot walk--been thinking about this and how I've been moving forward in my work and life: http://www.theartistplan.com/moving-forward/

Installation artist Amy Stacey Curtis talks about the idea of moving forward, in her solo-biennial and video process, as well as in her life.

Thought I'd share working excerpts from my upcoming book and my eventual memoir. The former is the "behind-the-scenes" of my 18-year project while the latter is the behind-the-scenes, behind-the-scenes of these 18 years: http://www.theartistplan.com/behind-the-scenes/

In Behind The Scenes, installation artist and writer, Amy Stacey Curtis shares working excerpts from her upcoming book 9 SOLO BIENNIALS and her memoir.

Amy Stacey Curtis writes about the micro-choreography of her exhibits; and why she tries to use as few words as possible; and how she hopes for a smaller life when her solo-biennial project is done.

Amy Stacey Curtis writes about the micro-choreography of her exhibits; and how she hopes for a smaller life when her solo-biennial project is done.

There are objects I've used for/at every solo biennial installation art exhibit for 17 years (my lucky measuring tape, my trusty thesaurus and dictionary, my lucky bucket, and my lucky vacuum cleaner Fred 1 (who I kept bringing with Fred 2 even after Fred 1's can't-vacuum-another-mill demise), so as not to tempt the art fates: http://www.theartistplan.com/luck-be-a-lady/

In Luck Be A Lady, artist Amy Stacey Curtis talks about luck vs. things meant to be, also a lucky measuring tape, vacuum, and zombie stack tippers.

Installation Artist Amy Stacey Curtis talks about the number 9 in her work and other things real and not so real.

Installation Artist Amy Stacey Curtis talks about the number 9 in her work and other things real and not so real.

I wrote this morning about my "Project Butterfly," what I'm doing now that I'm done with EMDR and recovered from PTSD, to starting making my outsides feel as good as my insides: http://www.theartistplan.com/project-butterfly/

After EMDR and PTSD, Amy Stacey Curtis shares her Project Butterfly, what she will do to starting making her outsides feel as good as her insides.

Artist Amy Stacey Curtis writes about her hospital stay, and how she doesn't feel sympathy falls between shit and syphilis as her grandmother once said.

Artist Amy Stacey Curtis writes about her hospital stay, and how she doesn't feel sympathy falls between shit and syphilis as her grandmother once said.

As artists, we're all starting from somewhere, right? And, it seems when we finish something, it's really a beginning.

Sharing some of her college drawings, Amy Stacey Curtis talks about how, as artists, we are all starting from somewhere, and how ends are really beginnings.

The main idea behind my work might have come from watching Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. http://www.theartistplan.com/a-close-encounter/

In A Close Encounter, Amy Stacey Curtis talks about her work and its connection to Star Wars and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

Amy Stacey Curtis writes about placing, fitting, vs. forcing her solo-biennial ideas into mills that are either perfect for her concepts, almost perfect, or a little less: http://www.theartistplan.com/almost-perfect/

Installation artist Amy Stacey Curtis talks about placing, fitting, and forcing her pre-conceived solo-biennial ideas into perfect or almost perfect mills.

I'm sharing “just a little bit” about my work in the context of EMDR, depression, and PTSD. I’ll soon be thriving, rather than surviving. www.theartistplan.com

Installation artist and writer Amy Stacey Curtis shares "just a little bit" about EMDR, depression, and PTSD.

Before...After...I recently visited the space I used for my 1st solo biennial in 2000. There's a lot less to it now. But it would be great to return in 2016.

I recently visited the space I used for my solo biennial in There's a lot less to it now. But it would be great to return in

In The Haunted Mills Of Maine, artist Amy Stacey Curtis writes of her ghost experiences while mounting her solo-biennial exhibits of interactive installation: http://www.theartistplan.com/the-haunted-mills-of-maine/

In The Haunted Mills Of Maine, Amy Stacey Curtis writes of her ghost experiences while mounting her solo-biennial exhibits of interactive installation.

Amy Stacey Curtis writes about how for each solo biennial, she figures out which mill space is best for the 9 interactive installations she wants to do. http://www.theartistplan.com/securing-the-mill-part-2/

Ayers Island Mill Orono, Maine - A worker whose death accidental death occurred under mysterious circumstances and a little girl murdered by her father are said to haunt here.

How I've secured the mills for my 8 Maine solo biennials; and how I hope this will work one more time for my 9th: http://www.theartistplan.com/securing-the-mill-part-1/

Amy Stacey Curtis talks about her rigorous process of securing the mill for each of her nine solo-biennial exhibits throughout Maine (Part