Andrzej
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Moesgaard Museum, reconstructions of our ancestors made by Adrie and Alfons Kennis

Moesgaard Museum, reconstructions of our ancestors made by Adrie and Alfons Kennis

Dissolving brittle stars hint at implications of ocean acidification

Sea urchins and brittle starfish on the seabed at Explorers Cove in Antarctica. The rate the starfish decay offers clues to ocean acidification. Photo courtesy of Shawn Harper.

Epihippus gracilis. Epihippus is an extinct genus of the modern horse family Equidae that lived in the Eocene, from 46 to 38 million years ago.Epihippus is believed to have evolved from Orohippus, which continued the evolutionary trend of increasingly efficient grinding teeth. Epihippus had five grinding, low-crowned cheek teeth with well-formed crests. Image: detail of the Hancock Mammal Quarry mural by Roger Witter

Epihippus gracilis. Epihippus is an extinct genus of the modern horse family Equidae that lived in the Eocene, from 46 to 38 million years ago.Epihippus is believed to have evolved from Orohippus, which continued the evolutionary trend of increasingly efficient grinding teeth. Epihippus had five grinding, low-crowned cheek teeth with well-formed crests. Image: detail of the Hancock Mammal Quarry mural by Roger Witter

The Hancock Mammal Quarry mural by Roger Witter. In this recreation Epihippus gracilis and and Haploipus texanus, a more primitive specimen, coexist. The John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. Oregon

The Hancock Mammal Quarry mural by Roger Witter. In this recreation Epihippus gracilis and and Haploipus texanus, a more primitive specimen, coexist. The John Day Fossil Beds National Monument.

Megaconus - April Isch

A newly discovered fossil reveals the evolutionary adaptations of a proto-mammal, providing evidence that traits such as hair and fur originated well before the rise of the first true mammals. The biological .

Bramatherium by WillemSvdMerwe.deviantart.com on @deviantART

Bramatherium prehistoric giraffe, short-necked but stoutly built, a very weird arrangement of horns on its skull, a Y-shaped pair in front with a second smaller pair behind it. This one lived from India to Turkey a few million years ago.