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    Rebel with a cause...


    Rebel with a cause...

    • 79 Pins

    Personal use only please ...

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    flyingunicornllc.blogspot.com

    Schindler’s funeral. His survivors follow the coffin through the streets of the Jerusalem Old City on the way to the Latin cemetery - This Day in History: Oct 9, 1974: Oskar Schindler dies

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    dingeengoete.blogspot.com

    Admiral Peary on the main deck of the "Roosevelt", 1909.

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    mnn.com

    Suffragettes ~ 1911 - thank God for these brave women!

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    vintage-rama.blogspot.com

    During World War II, Josephine Baker served with the French Red Cross and was an active member of the French resistance movement. Using her career as a cover Baker became an intelligence agent, carrying secret messages written in invisible ink on her sheet music. She was awarded honor of the Croix de Guerre, and received a Medal of the Resistance in 1946.

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    .}Born Audrey Kathleen Ruston, she would later change her name to Edda von Heemstra to protect herself from the Germans in 1940. Later she would take her famous surname from her great grandmother, Kathleen Hepburn and the rest is history{.

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    thethoughtexperiment.wordpress.com

    Eleanor Roosevelt's letter to the Daughters of the American Revolution, resigning from the organization after their refusal to allow Marion Anderson to sing at the Lincoln Memorial.

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    archives.gov

    WWII -- original caption: "Willa Beatrice Brown, a 31-year-old Negro American, serves her country by training pilots for the U.S. Army Air Forces. She is the first Negro woman to receive a commission as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Civil Air Patrol."

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    Annie Edson Taylor was an American adventurer who, on her 63rd birthday, October 24, 1901, became the first person to survive a trip over Niagara Falls in a barrel. She is pictured with the cat she sent over the falls in the barrel a few days earlier to test its strength.

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    vintagephoto.livejournal.com

    Marlene Dietrich, "a German who had renounced her country following the rise of the Nazis and rejected Hitler's request that she return--became an ardent and fearless supporter of the Allied Forces, performing hundreds of times for the troops as near the war zone as she could get." " When asked why she had traveled to war zones to entertain and comfort Allied troops, she famously and simply replied, "aus Anstand." "It was the decent thing to do.""

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    iwm.org.uk

    War Quote - Robert E Lee

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    imgfave.com

    Clara Barton (1821-1912), the founder and first president of the American Red Cross, acquired her broad skill set of urgent medical care, long-term care for invalids, locating and reuniting lost family members and soldiers, etc. through “on-the-job training” during some of the bloodiest battles of the Civil War.

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    wikitree.com

    Florence Nightingale CDV by H Lenthall.jpg

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    en.wikipedia.org

    Jane Goodall

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    Lillian Russel. A plus size beauty in the late 1800s. She was around 200 lb at the peak of her career. She was considered "The American Beauty."

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    judgmentofparis.com

    Annie Oakley, shown in this cabinet card, was born in Darke County, Ohio in 1860. Her full name was Phoebe Anne Oakley Mozee.

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    ohiomemory.org

    First woman to enlist, 1917, yeoman in US Navy

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    findagrave.com

    Mary Edwards Walker (November 26, 1832 - February 21, 1919) was an American feminist, abolitionist, prohibitionist, alleged spy, prisoner of war and surgeon. She is one of only eight civilians, and the only woman ever to receive the Medal of Honor.

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    en.wikipedia.org

    Corrie ten Boom. Author of 'The Hiding Place' and seven other books. The ten Boom family were a Christian family who hid many Jews in Amsterdam during the Holocaust. They were ultimately betrayed and caught and sent to prison and concentration camps; she survived and after the war set up rehabilitation centers that sheltered concentration camp survivors as well as now desperate Dutch collaborators who had persecuted them.

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    corrietenboom.com

    The only person to hold two Nobel Prizes is a woman. Marie Curie was honored for her work in both Physics & Chemistry and her pioneering research in radioactivity changed history.

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    bbc.co.uk

    Though born into slavery Biddy Mason gained freedom for herself and her children in 1856. Only ten years later she had saved enough money to purchase property, making her the first African American women to own land in Los Angeles. A nurse and midwife by profession, she helped found the first elementary school for African American children in Los Angeles,

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    garlandeharris.com

    Danny Thomas, actor, and founder of St. Jude's Children's Hospital. No child is ever turned away, for not being able to pay. An angel!

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    en.wikipedia.org

    Hugh O’Flaherty was an Irish Catholic priest who saved about 4,000 Allied soldiers and Jews in Rome during World War II. O’Flaherty used his status as a priest and his protection by the Vatican to conceal 4000 escapees – Allied soldiers and Jews – in flats, farms and convents. Despite the Nazis desperately wanting to stop his actions, his protection by the Vatican prevented them officially arresting him. He saved the majority of Jews in Rome.

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    listverse.com

    Lucretia Coffin Mott (1793 - 1880)."..was an American Quaker, abolitionist, social reformer, and proponent of women's rights. She is said to be one of the first American feminists in the early 19th century...an early advocate for women's political power and influence in America, where women could not vote until 1920."

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    b-womeninamericanhistory19.blogspot.com

    Nellie Bly (real name Elizabeth Jane Cochran, above) was a 23-year-old journalist without a job when she walked into the offices of Joseph Pulitzer’s New York World in 1887 and was given the daunting assignment of exposing the horrors of the Blackwell’s Island Insane Asylum. She rehearsed feverishly. She played mad. “Undoubtedly demented… a hopeless case,” said one of the doctors who admitted her. But inside the asylum she chronicled the awful food and awful conditions that spurred reform.

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    guardian.co.uk