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Armour: 10th Century - 20th

10th Century - 20th Century armours from all over the world.


Armour: 10th Century - 20th

  • 95 Pins

North German, 1550-1650.

Chilta hazar masha (coat of a thousand nails), kulah khud (helmet), bazu band (arm guards). Indian armored clothing made from layers of fabric faced with velvet and studded with numerous small brass nails, which were often gilded. Fabric armor was very popular in India because metal became very hot under the Indian sun. This example has additional armor plates on the chest area, arms, and thighs. The Wallace Collection, London England.

Gorget Flanders: In the style of the seventeenth century (?), Cast iron and engraved with a scene of fighting between knights in armor.

16th century engraved breastplate from a man-at-arms' harness

Harquebusier armour belonging to King James II, England. (1686) Courtesy Royal Armouries

Fit for a King: formidable royal armour displayed at the Tower of London | Culture24

kirstiebrewer.wordpress.com

WWI Armor. Gotta love Retronaut!

16th century engraved breastplate from a man-at-arms' harness by Arutemu, via Flickr

The Field Armor of King Henry VIII of England “This impressive armor was made for Henry VIII (r. 1509–47) towards the end of his life when he was overweight and crippled with gout. Constructed for use on horse and on foot it was probably worn by the king during his last military campaign, the siege of Boulogne in 1544.”

Breastplate, A.D. 1000/1470 Chimú North coast, Peru Gold

Armor for Heavy Cavalry, French, circa 1600 One of the best preserved French armors dating from the reign of Henry IV (1589–1610), this example demonstrates the French preference for completely gilt armors

Hauberk Half Armour, or Bakhterets Moscow Armoury workshops (?) Late 16th- early 17th centuries

Antique Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Indian War Elephant armor, 17th century, made of sheet iron panels and chainmail. Some of the panels have designs of elephants, fish, peacocks and lotus flowers hammered out. The elephant armor is so heavy that it takes three members of staff to lift the headpiece alone. Some of the panels are missing, revealing the way cotton would have been used under the armor for the animal's comfort. Royal Armouries in Leeds, England. Worth a visit -- been there several times.

Indian dastana/bazu band (arm guards) and char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran.

Ottoman krug (chest armor), back plate. 16th-17th Century. A large central circular plate with a raised central boss, five attached top and side plates, shoulder plate, all linked with heavy riveted chain links and embossed or engraved with intricate designs. The top of the plate has a flat top edge, which denotes it is a back plate, breast plates have a neck cut-out. Bequest of George C. Stone, 1935, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Mail and plate kolçak (greaves), calf and ankle protection as worn by fully armored cavalryman, steel. Damascened with silver and partly gilt. 15th century Aq-Quyunlu/Shirvani period. Museums often confuse kolçak (greaves) for kolluk/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), even in Turkish museums they are labeled as arm guards and mounted on the arms of display mannequins rather than on the lower leg.

Armour of Philip I Royal Armouries Madrid The most noteable item related to this armour is the unusual helmet, which is patterend after an ecclesiastical biretta or a civilian hat of the period. The skull is quartered with four ridges in high relief arranged in a cross, and has two plates riveted to it`s edges to form a wide upturned brim.

Germanic armor, c. 1470

(Field armour of William Somerset, earl of Worcester, about 1570)

‘Taken from the catacombs of Rome in the 17th century, the relics of twelve martyred saints were then attired in the regalia of the period before being interred in a remote church on the German/Czech border.’ - Immortal, Toby de Silva. What is interesting is the armour on this guy. It has holes in it in order to display the skeleton beneath. This lucky guy is St. Pancratius.

Retronaut - 1600s: Jewelled Skeletons

retronaut.com

Helmet, Egyptian, c. 1293-1341. This helmet bears the name of the Mamluk sultan Ibn Qala’un, who ruled from Cairo a century before Barquq, the sultan who appointed and dismissed Ibn Khaldun as chief justice on several occasions.

Silvered and engraved armour of Henry VIII. English, Greenwich, about 1515. The armour commemorates the marriage Of King Henry VIII and Katherine of Aragon. The man's armour made by Peter Fevers and the horse armour made by Guille Margot. Armour was to commemorate his marriage to Catherine of Aragon.

Helmet with Neck Guard of Mail and Nose Guard ca. 16th century Helmets like this, that have preserved their original chain-mail “aventail,” or face and neck covering, have been likened to masks that conceal the face and create a sense of mystery. Their primary function, however, was to protect the wearer. Islamic helmets often were decorated with inscriptions that invoke God’s power and blessing. Sometimes, as here, the writing cannot be easily deciphered and may even be meaningless.

Brigantine made in France or Italy in 16th century, Paris, Musée national du Moyen Age - Thermes de Cluny

Arming coat from 16th century, Germany