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Season to Season: Earth's Equinoxes & Solstices #Infographic

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Season to Season: Earth's Equinoxes & Solstices (Infographic)

ouramazingplanet.com

Individual images taken of the Sun in one year to create a full curve called an analemma. The summer solstice being at the top, winter solstice at the bottom, and equinox where the lines cross. (Credit: Jesús Peláez)

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orangeinks.com

The Old Moon in the New Moon's Arms. Taken on Nowruz, the March 20 equinox, from Esfahan, Iran. (Image Credit & Copyright: M. Taha Ghouchkanlu) Earthshine is Sunlight reflected off the Earth and illuminating the Moon's night side. Mona Evans, "Earthshine" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art301287.asp

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apod.nasa.gov

Solar Eclipse Analemma (Image & copyright: Cenk E. Tezel & Tunç Tezel (TWAN)) Take a picture that includes the Sun in the same place every day & over a year the Sun positions make a figure-8 called an analemma. At northern Winter Solstice the Sun is at the bottom of the analemma. This analemma, shot in Turkey, starting in 2015, includes a total solar eclipse. The base image was taken during totality on 2009-03-29. Mona Evans, “Winter Solstice”…

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APOD: 2013 December 22 - Tutulemma: Solar Eclipse Analemma

apod.nasa.gov

from Slate Magazine

The Autumnal Equinox … FROM SPACE!

Earth at Equinox. 2013-09-22. (Photo: Roscosmos / NTSOMZ/ SRC "Planeta" / zelenyikot. livejournal. com) The Russian weather satellite Electro-L captured this image. The image is in visible light and near infrared. The near IR picks out vegetation and has been given a greenish tint. Mona Evans, "Autumnal Equinox" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art178064.asp

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slate.com

Harvest moon on the day of the autumnal equinox, Sept. 22, 2010, Douglas County, Oregon. The Moon (and the setting Sun) look red when low in the sky, because the light has traveled through more air. The air particles tend to act as a filter to scatter the bluer light. The Moon also looks bigger when it's low in the sky, but its size doesn't change. (Photo credit & copyright: Robin Loznak) ©Mona Evans, "Autumnal Equinox" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles

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Solstice at Newgrange, a 5000-year-old megalithic tomb in County Meath, Ireland, aligned to the solstice Sun. Within the mound's inner chamber the first rays of the solstice sunrise pass through a box above the entrance & shine down an 18-meter tunnel to light the floor at the foot of a decorated stone. 5000 years ago the stone itself would have been illuminated. (Credit: Cyril Byrne, courtesy of The Irish Times) Mona Evans, "Winter Solstice" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art179016.asp

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APOD: 2008 December 20 - Solstice at Newgrange

apod.nasa.gov

Sunrise analemma (2012: April 2-Sept 16). If you mark the Sun's position at the same time each day for a year, it makes a figure 8. This picture shows just half that, almost from equinox to equinox. The Sun is at its highest point at the June solstice and also seems to stand still. If you click to enlarge, you can see a little dot at June 6. That's Venus in transit. (Image credit & copyright: Tunc Tezel) ©Mona Evans, “Why Planets Have Seasons” http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art54046.asp

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The celestial sphere. This is a projection into space of the Earth's coordinate system. The ecliptic is the Earth's path around the Sun - it's tilted to the equator because Earth's axis is tilted. Mona Evans "Equinoxes and the Ecliptic" http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art20530.asp

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Manhattanhenge. (photo: twi-ny/mdr) Twice a year the Sun sets between the skyscrapers of the east-west streets in what astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson dubbed "Manhattanhenge" as the tall buildings are reminiscent of Stonehenge. If the Manhattan street grid were precisely aligned with the compass points, it would occur on the March and September solstices, but it happens in May and July. ©Mona Evans, “Why Planets Have Seasons” http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art54046.asp

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