Peter Higgs, (born 29 May 1929) is a British theoretical physicist and emeritus professor at the University of Edinburgh. He is best known for his 1960s proposal of broken symmetry in electroweak theory, explaining the origin of mass of particles. This so-called Higgs mechanism predicts the existence of a new particle the Higgs boson. CERN announced on July 4th, 2012 that they had experimentally established the existence of a Higgs-like boson.

Peter Higgs, (born 29 May 1929) is a British theoretical physicist and emeritus professor at the University of Edinburgh. He is best known for his 1960s proposal of broken symmetry in electroweak theory, explaining the origin of mass of particles. This so-called Higgs mechanism predicts the existence of a new particle the Higgs boson. CERN announced on July 4th, 2012 that they had experimentally established the existence of a Higgs-like boson.

Niels Bohr (1885–1962) was a Danish physicist who made foundational contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922.

Niels Bohr (1885–1962) was a Danish physicist who made foundational contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922.

Hans Geiger (1882–1945) was a German physicist. It is impossible to discuss the history of the atom without reference to the famous gold foil experiment by Ernest Rutherford in 1909, which demonstrated experimentally for the first time the existence of the atomic nucleus. The results paved the way for Niels Bohr to develop his own atomic model. A key element of that experiment was the invention of a reliable device able to measure alpha radiation, by Rutherford’s lab assistant, Hans Geiger.

Hans Geiger (1882–1945) was a German physicist. It is impossible to discuss the history of the atom without reference to the famous gold foil experiment by Ernest Rutherford in 1909, which demonstrated experimentally for the first time the existence of the atomic nucleus. The results paved the way for Niels Bohr to develop his own atomic model. A key element of that experiment was the invention of a reliable device able to measure alpha radiation, by Rutherford’s lab assistant, Hans Geiger.

Pavel Cherenkov (1904–1990) was a Soviet physicist who shared the Nobel Prize in physics in 1958 with Ilya Frank and Igor Tamm for the discovery of Cherenkov radiation, made in 1934.

Pavel Cherenkov (1904–1990) was a Soviet physicist who shared the Nobel Prize in physics in 1958 with Ilya Frank and Igor Tamm for the discovery of Cherenkov radiation, made in 1934.

Richard Phillips Feynman (1918–1988) was an American physicist. For his contributions to the development of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman, jointly with Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga, received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965. He developed a widely used pictorial representation scheme for the mathematical expressions governing the behavior of subatomic particles, which later became known as Feynman diagrams.

Richard Phillips Feynman (1918–1988) was an American physicist. For his contributions to the development of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman, jointly with Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga, received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965. He developed a widely used pictorial representation scheme for the mathematical expressions governing the behavior of subatomic particles, which later became known as Feynman diagrams.

Domenico Pacini making a measurement in 1910 - Domenico Pacini (1878-1934) was an Italian physicist noted for his contributions to the discovery of cosmic rays.  (Image credit: Pacini family)

Domenico Pacini making a measurement in 1910 - Domenico Pacini (1878-1934) was an Italian physicist noted for his contributions to the discovery of cosmic rays. (Image credit: Pacini family)

Cherenkov work at the base of Mt. Hopkins in 1967 -     Cherenkov radiation (also spelled Čerenkov) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle (such as an electron) passes through a dielectric medium at a speed greater than the phase velocity of light in that medium. The charged particles polarize the molecules of that medium, which then turn back rapidly to their ground state, emitting a characteristic blue glow radiation in the process.

Cherenkov work at the base of Mt. Hopkins in 1967 - Cherenkov radiation (also spelled Čerenkov) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle (such as an electron) passes through a dielectric medium at a speed greater than the phase velocity of light in that medium. The charged particles polarize the molecules of that medium, which then turn back rapidly to their ground state, emitting a characteristic blue glow radiation in the process.

Video: The pigeon, the antenna and me: Robert Wilson -   Radioastronomer Robert Wilson recalls a pair of pigeons who almost thwarted the discovery of cosmic background radiation. Wilson’s discovery of cosmic background radiation, “the echo of the big bang”, earned him a share of the 1978 Nobel Prize in physics.

Video: The pigeon, the antenna and me: Robert Wilson - Radioastronomer Robert Wilson recalls a pair of pigeons who almost thwarted the discovery of cosmic background radiation. Wilson’s discovery of cosmic background radiation, “the echo of the big bang”, earned him a share of the 1978 Nobel Prize in physics.

NOT a #icrc2015 group picture! :-)  Greatest moment in the history of Physics: A clash of titans at the Solvay conference in 1927.  Would you have recognized them all?  #Solvay #physicists   #particlephysics #astrophysics #astroparticle

NOT a #icrc2015 group picture! :-) Greatest moment in the history of Physics: A clash of titans at the Solvay conference in 1927. Would you have recognized them all? #Solvay #physicists #particlephysics #astrophysics #astroparticle

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