Catholic Worker crusader Dorothy Day with her prison dress [covered with autographs!] On November 1917 Day went to prison for being one of forty women in front of the White House protesting women's exclusion from the electorate. Arriving at a rural workhouse, the women were roughly handled. The women responded with a hunger strike. Finally they were freed by presidential order.

Catholic Worker crusader Dorothy Day with her prison dress [covered with autographs!] On November 1917 Day went to prison for being one of forty women in front of the White House protesting women's exclusion from the electorate. Arriving at a rural workhouse, the women were roughly handled. The women responded with a hunger strike. Finally they were freed by presidential order.

Dr. Elizabeth Bruyn, sitting in the back of a horse drawn ambulance. Dr. Bryun was an ambulance surgeon in New York City in the early 1900's. On her first day at work in 1910, she saved the life of an 18 month old baby who had been overcome by gas from a leak in an apartment. Find out more about this courageous woman at http://www.strangecosmos.com/content/item/138962.html

Dr. Elizabeth Bruyn, sitting in the back of a horse drawn ambulance. Dr. Bryun was an ambulance surgeon in New York City in the early 1900's. On her first day at work in 1910, she saved the life of an 18 month old baby who had been overcome by gas from a leak in an apartment. Find out more about this courageous woman at http://www.strangecosmos.com/content/item/138962.html

Grace O'Malley was a tough-ass 16th century Irish warrior chick who led a horde of broadsword-swinging Vikings, Celts, and Scottish Highlanders in naval operations that would dominate the coast of Ireland for a couple of decades. Known to her contemporaries as "The Pirate Queen of Connaught," this ginger gunslinger raided shipping vessels, battled English armies, conquered castles from rival Irish clans, and once traveled to London just so she could talk shit to Queen Elizabeth in person.

Grace O'Malley was a tough-ass 16th century Irish warrior chick who led a horde of broadsword-swinging Vikings, Celts, and Scottish Highlanders in naval operations that would dominate the coast of Ireland for a couple of decades. Known to her contemporaries as "The Pirate Queen of Connaught," this ginger gunslinger raided shipping vessels, battled English armies, conquered castles from rival Irish clans, and once traveled to London just so she could talk shit to Queen Elizabeth in person.

Pearl Buck (1892-1973), writer, civil rights activist, winner 1938 Nobel Prize in Literature. Born Hillsboro, West Virginia to missionary parents. Taken to China at 3 months old. Graduated Randolph-Macon Woman's College, Lynchburg, VA, Phi Beta Kappa, 1914. Masters from Cornell University in 1925. In 1949, outraged that existing adoption services considered Asian and mixed-race children unadoptable, Buck established Welcome House, Inc., the first international, interracial adoption agency.

Pearl Buck (1892-1973), writer, civil rights activist, winner 1938 Nobel Prize in Literature. Born Hillsboro, West Virginia to missionary parents. Taken to China at 3 months old. Graduated Randolph-Macon Woman's College, Lynchburg, VA, Phi Beta Kappa, 1914. Masters from Cornell University in 1925. In 1949, outraged that existing adoption services considered Asian and mixed-race children unadoptable, Buck established Welcome House, Inc., the first international, interracial adoption agency.

This photograph was taken in 1895, and shows Calamity Jane. Calamity Jane was a colorful figure from the Old West. She was friends with Wild Bill Hickock, and in later years was a member of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. Calamity Jane died on this day, August 1, in the year 1903. She was buried next to Wild Bill.

This photograph was taken in 1895, and shows Calamity Jane. Calamity Jane was a colorful figure from the Old West. She was friends with Wild Bill Hickock, and in later years was a member of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. Calamity Jane died on this day, August 1, in the year 1903. She was buried next to Wild Bill.

Victoria Claflin Woodhull the first woman to run for President in 1872, a time when most women did not even have the right to vote.

The First Woman To Run For President — In 1872

Victoria Claflin Woodhull the first woman to run for President in 1872, a time when most women did not even have the right to vote.

Victoria Woodhull was an American leader of the woman's suffrage movement and a woman of many firsts. She was the first woman to start a weekly newspaper, the first woman to operate a brokerage firm on Wall Street, and in 1872, she was the first female candidate for President of the United States.

Victoria Woodhull was an American leader of the woman's suffrage movement and a woman of many firsts. She was the first woman to start a weekly newspaper, the first woman to operate a brokerage firm on Wall Street, and in 1872, she was the first female candidate for President of the United States.

Mary Bethune lifted herself from the cotton field to the White House as an adviser to the President of the United States. Her greatest accomplishment, however, was almost single-handily building Bethune-Cookman College in 1923.

Mary Bethune lifted herself from the cotton field to the White House as an adviser to the President of the United States. Her greatest accomplishment, however, was almost single-handily building Bethune-Cookman College in 1923.

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