The Yanomami are a group of approximately 35,000 indigenous people who live in some 200–250 villages in the Amazon rainforest on the border between Venezuela and Brazil.

The Yanomami are a group of approximately 35,000 indigenous people who live in some 200–250 villages in the Amazon rainforest on the border between Venezuela and Brazil.

For the first time, extraordinary aerial footage of one of the world's last uncontacted tribes.

For the first time, extraordinary aerial footage of one of the world's last uncontacted tribes.

An elder from the Matses tribe in Peru's Amazon jungle, wear the traditional whiskers and spike in her chin.  She has facial tattoos and paints achiote fruit onto her face.  Her tribe is often referred to as "The Cat People".   Photographed by Alicia Fox as part of Portraits of The Disappearing Amazon project

An elder from the Matses tribe in Peru's Amazon jungle, wear the traditional whiskers and spike in her chin. She has facial tattoos and paints achiote fruit onto her face. Her tribe is often referred to as "The Cat People". Photographed by Alicia Fox as part of Portraits of The Disappearing Amazon project

Skin painted bright red, heads partially shaved, arrows drawn back in the longbows and aimed square at the aircraft buzzing overhead. The gesture is unmistakable: Stay Away.    Behind the two men stands another figure, possibly a woman, her stance also seemingly defiant. Her skin painted dark, nearly black.    The apparent aggression shown by these people is quite understandable. For they are members of one of Earth's last uncontacted tribes, who live in the Envira region in the thick…

Incredible pictures of one of Earth's last uncontacted tribes firing bows and arrows

Skin painted bright red, heads partially shaved, arrows drawn back in the longbows and aimed square at the aircraft buzzing overhead. The gesture is unmistakable: Stay Away. Behind the two men stands another figure, possibly a woman, her stance also seemingly defiant. Her skin painted dark, nearly black. The apparent aggression shown by these people is quite understandable. For they are members of one of Earth's last uncontacted tribes, who live in the Envira region in the thick…

Amazonian tribe in Brazil caught on camera for first time - video

Amazonian tribe in Brazil caught on camera for first time - video

The last of the Kawahiva are forced to live on the run from armed loggers and powerful ranchers (image taken during a chance encounter with Brazilian government agents).

Pinterest
Search