Gardening

Gardening tips and more from the Statesman staff.


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Gardening

Gardening

  • 21 Pins

Color is the most conspicuous element in the landscape. It’s what others notice when they visit and it’s how we plan on our forays to local nurseries.

Plant with color wheel for garden look you want

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The occasional rains and breaks in the heat encourage us all to spend some of our summer outdoors, and nothing makes the yard, patio or porch more inviting than flowers.

Still not too late to plant colorful blooms

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Maize which is more commonly known as corn, is one of the most ancient food crops in the world. Originally domesticated in Mesoamerica, the Olmec and Mayan cultures cultivated corn for its grain, which easily grew in different climates.

Plant sweet corn for eating, making soup

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In a typical year, June is too late for planting in Central Texas. The weather is already hot and dry and the best we can hope for is to keep already-planted things alive for a few more weeks.

Unusual weather means more time for planting

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When Dorsey Barger and partner Susan Hausmann first came across their East Austin property in 2009, it was piled with junk and contained three abandoned homes where drug users liked to hang out.

Cool House Tour features sustainable HausBar Farms

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Wondering what to plant this fall? Think in the goosefoot family (Swiss chard, spinach and beets are some) Plus, a recipe for Crustless Swiss Chard Quiche

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September is a tricky month for gardeners, but a good time to plan your fall planting!

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Sensory gardening - it's not just about the look! Think of smells, feels and sounds when you're planning your garden

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Garden coaches help brown thumbs become green

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Before the current hot trend of farm-to-table really got going, Martha Cason started Garza Gardens at Garza Independence High School in 1999 as a way to teach kids about commerce and government in a hands-on way. The herbs grown at Garza are sold to area restaurants through Farm to Table.

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No place to garden? Rocky soil? No problem: How to garden anywhere

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Some young urbanites are turning to agriculture as a new career, joining a new generation of younger farmers. Others are returning to farming roots that go back for generations.

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Using fish and pool-bound plants, three local farms are changing the way food is grown. (Photo by Ashley Landis)

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The Austin Pond Society is hosting its 19th Annual Pond Tour June 8-9. Click through to read about what it takes to create a pond, and why people do it

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Have you seen (or been gifted) a grow your own mushrooms kit? Our Addie Broyles tests out kits from Austin's 100th Monkey Mushroom Farm. Click through for more

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Fredericksburg peaches are scarce in Austin grocery stores right now, because a trifecta of drought, late freeze and hail have decimated the Hill Country peach crop. Click through to read more:

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Old political campaign signs find a second life as garden building blocks. #recycling #gardening

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Get the feel of a tropical oasis with Texas-friendly plants

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Greens, greens everywhere and creative ways to eat them

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Amend the soil in your vegetable gardens now for summer crops

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Mr. Smarty Plants answers questions about mountain laurel, purple passionflower, gall wasps and name that tree

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