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Hair Combs: China, Mongolia, Tibet, Nepal, Central Asia

The collection includes all types of hair ornaments: combs, pins, diadems, crowns, and tiaras.


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Hair Combs: China, Mongolia, Tibet, Nepal, Central Asia

Hair Combs: China, Mongolia, Tibet, Nepal, Central Asia

  • 561 Pins

A KINGFISHER FEATHER 'JEWEL'-ENCRUSTED HEADDRESS, FENG TIAN

Kingfisher hair ornaments

FIVE KINGFISHER FEATHER HAIR ORNAMENTS

Mongolia | Headdress pendants from Gulchagan, Honichin; silver, turquoise, coral, agate and other materials | ©The Splendour of Ethnic Jewelry: From the Colette and Jean-Pierre Ghysels Collection. Text: France Borel. Photographs: John Bigelow Taylor. Thames and Hudson, 1994. Page 172

BarbaraAnne
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Uzbekistan ~ Bukhara | Headdress; silver, enamel, turquoise and agate (carnelian) stones | 19th / 20th century

Chinee hair ornament. 1938 Ornament (flower-shaped). Hair-pin end. Made of filigree gold.

nepal: Register 1954: Woman's hair ornament made of yellow metal disk with repousse floral ornament and seven studs of red composition; copper pin on back.

2 HAIRPINS MADE OF IMITATION PEARL (GLASS) FIGURES OF BIRDS. Identified as a pair of white phoenix hair ornaments, China

A pair of Chinese hairpins collected in 1895 by Capt. Benjamin Bradford.

BarbaraAnne
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AN ARCHAISTIC MOTTLED JADE SCABBARD SLIDE, MING DYNASTY

A carved and reticulated celadon and russet jade Dragon finial, Yuan Dynasty.

Crown strong paper ecru color, painted on one side of characters and mounted on an ecru cotton and yellow ribbon used to tie it on the head of the priest.

A Dian Cui hairpin from the Qing Dynasty...

A CELADON AND RUSSET JADE HAIR ORNAMENT MING DYNASTY, carved with a curved top and coiled at the ends to resemble a scroll, the interior hollow to fit over a topknot, with holes in the ends to secure a hairpin, the stone with a slight yellow tinge, russet mottling and opaque inclusions, box.

Golden Crown, Ming Dynasty, Yunnan Provincial Museum, Kunming. This splendid golden crown illustrates the amazing richness of China during the Early Ming period, when even local kings had access to wealth that would have been almost unimaginable in earlier times.

Coronet, is the necessary ornaments of bride in ancient China, So the Coronet,'s design is also very exquisite, with the influence of itself heavier and the veil's coming, the pieces of jewelry is lost.

Chinese Hair Ornament, Tang Dynasty (700 - 900 AD). Gold and turquoise.

BarbaraAnne
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BarbaraAnne

Vietnam 10th - 11th century, Cham Dynasty embossed gold plate on a toothed silver plate, set with stones.

BarbaraAnne
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Government official's headpiece, Tibet. Made of gold and turquoise. Diameter: 9.7 cm. Shown by Jane Casey Singer, in *Gold Jewelry from Tibet and Nepal* (1996), p. 115. The ornament was held to be a proper indication of the rank of a highly respected member of society, who would be recognizable as an official when wearing it.

A GOLD HAIRPIN - YUAN/MING DYNASTY, 13TH-17TH CENTURY.

A JADEITE AND PEARL-EMBELLISHED GOLD HAIR PIN

An ornamental crown/comb. Tibet/Nepal, 18th c or earlier. The basic metal used is copper, which is covered with a thin layer of solid gold (not gilding). The central stone is a turquoise and the other two are corals of great age. The face in the middle is a Kirthimuka ("Face of Glory"). (Joost Daalder)

BarbaraAnne
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A very genuine and early Uzbeki piece: definitely 19th c. An "osma-tuzi", a frontal ornament from Khorezm, Uzbekistan. Silver gilt, turquoise, corals, glass. State Museum of History of Uzbekistan, Tashkent. A wondrous piece from the highly reliable source showing early Uzbeki pieces called *A Song in Metal* (p. 226).

BarbaraAnne
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Although we (Truus and Joost Daalder) don't have the most grandiose form of Mongolian headdresses, we do have more than one decent one, and this is one of them. The image shows the front of a piece from *Ethnic Jewellery and Adornment*, p. 279. The main beads are a mixture of Chinese - so-called "Peking" - glass and coral. Early 20th c. (Joost Daalder)

BarbaraAnne
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"Although we (Truus and Joost Daalder) don't have the most grandiose form of Mongolian headdresses, we do have more than one decent one, and this is one of them. The image shows the front of a piece from *Ethnic Jewellery and Adornment*, p. 279. The main beads are a mixture of Chinese - so-called "Peking" - glass and coral. Early 20th c." Joost Daalder

BarbaraAnne
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