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Hair Combs: China, Mongolia, Tibet, Nepal, Central Asia

The collection includes all types of hair ornaments: combs, pins, diadems, crowns, and tiaras.


Hair Combs: China, Mongolia, Tibet, Nepal, Central Asia

  • 546 Pins

Coronet, is the necessary ornaments of bride in ancient China, So the Coronet,'s design is also very exquisite, with the influence of itself heavier and the veil's coming, the pieces of jewelry is lost.

Chinese Hair Ornament, Tang Dynasty (700 - 900 AD). Gold and turquoise.

Vietnam 10th - 11th century, Cham Dynasty embossed gold plate on a toothed silver plate, set with stones.

Government official's headpiece, Tibet. Made of gold and turquoise. Diameter: 9.7 cm. Shown by Jane Casey Singer, in *Gold Jewelry from Tibet and Nepal* (1996), p. 115. The ornament was held to be a proper indication of the rank of a highly respected member of society, who would be recognizable as an official when wearing it.

A GOLD HAIRPIN - YUAN/MING DYNASTY, 13TH-17TH CENTURY.

A JADEITE AND PEARL-EMBELLISHED GOLD HAIR PIN

An ornamental crown/comb. Tibet/Nepal, 18th c or earlier. The basic metal used is copper, which is covered with a thin layer of solid gold (not gilding). The central stone is a turquoise and the other two are corals of great age. The face in the middle is a Kirthimuka ("Face of Glory"). (Joost Daalder)

A very genuine and early Uzbeki piece: definitely 19th c. An "osma-tuzi", a frontal ornament from Khorezm, Uzbekistan. Silver gilt, turquoise, corals, glass. State Museum of History of Uzbekistan, Tashkent. A wondrous piece from the highly reliable source showing early Uzbeki pieces called *A Song in Metal* (p. 226).

Although we (Truus and Joost Daalder) don't have the most grandiose form of Mongolian headdresses, we do have more than one decent one, and this is one of them. The image shows the front of a piece from *Ethnic Jewellery and Adornment*, p. 279. The main beads are a mixture of Chinese - so-called "Peking" - glass and coral. Early 20th c. (Joost Daalder)

"Although we (Truus and Joost Daalder) don't have the most grandiose form of Mongolian headdresses, we do have more than one decent one, and this is one of them. The image shows the front of a piece from *Ethnic Jewellery and Adornment*, p. 279. The main beads are a mixture of Chinese - so-called "Peking" - glass and coral. Early 20th c." Joost Daalder

Headdress, silver gilt with glass beads, silk tassels and kingfisher, Chinese early 20th c (Archives : Sold Singkiang)

Pair of kingfisher , carnelian and glass pearl hair ornaments, China, 19th c (colection of Linda Pastorino)

A Richly Ornamented Kingfisher Feather Court Headdress. Qing Dynasty, 19th Century. Highly ornate headdresses of this type were worn with ritual clothes by Manchu ladies on special holidays or informal ceremonial occasions. The technique of inlaying feathers is called dianzi, meaning 'dotting the kingfishers', whereby the feather is cut into shape and attached with glue onto the base.

headdress with original ribbon.

headdress with hardstone jades and semi precious stones

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Opera headdress

Opera Headdress

Imperial ornament from a headdress