Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Gallery of Update: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture - 4

National Museum of African American History and Culture  "This is so beautiful, I want to cry."

Proposals for the National Museum of African American History and Culture REVEALED

This was the last known photograph taken of Dr. Anna J. Cooper in her Washington, D.C. home. Dr. Cooper was an American scholar and educator. Born a slave in Raleigh, North Carolina, when she earned her PhD in history from the University of Paris-Sorbonne in 1924, Dr. Cooper became the fourth African-American woman to earn a doctoral degree. Photo Source: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History

This was the last known photograph taken of Dr. Anna J. Cooper in her Washington, D.C. home. Dr. Cooper was an American scholar and educator. Born a slave in Raleigh, North Carolina, when she earned her PhD in history from the University of Paris-Sorbonne in 1924, Dr. Cooper became the fourth African-American woman to earn a doctoral degree. Photo Source: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History

Mrs Obama in custom Peter Som arriving at a ceremony for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington, DC.

The Michelle Obama Look Book 2012

Mrs Obama in custom Peter Som arriving at a ceremony for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington, DC.

Former housing. The 19th-century slave cabin on Edisto Island, S.C., will be transferred to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture’s collection.

Antebellum slave cabin in S.C. to be restored for African American History museum

Former housing. The 19th-century slave cabin on Edisto Island, S.C., will be transferred to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture’s collection.

African American Portraits: "Let Your Motto Be Resistance" | The legendary Judith Jamison. Smithsonian Institute, National Museum of African American History and Culture.

African American Portraits: "Let Your Motto Be Resistance" | The legendary Judith Jamison. Smithsonian Institute, National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Recognition of Powers' work came very early. In 1886, a young artist of Athens, Georgia, Jennie Smith, went to the Athens Cotton Fair. There she saw Powers' other great quilt, the Bible Quilt (now in the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, below). She wrote: "I have spent my whole life in the South, and am perfectly familiar with thirty patterns of quilts, but I had never seen an original design, and never a living creature portrayed in patchwork, until the year…

Recognition of Powers' work came very early. In 1886, a young artist of Athens, Georgia, Jennie Smith, went to the Athens Cotton Fair. There she saw Powers' other great quilt, the Bible Quilt (now in the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, below). She wrote: "I have spent my whole life in the South, and am perfectly familiar with thirty patterns of quilts, but I had never seen an original design, and never a living creature portrayed in patchwork, until the year…

JAMES PARKS | was born a Slave, in the year of 1843, on the Arlington estate. The military burial ground was created on land that was once the home of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. When the estate became Arlington National Cemetery, he stayed on as a freed man and dug graves. His great-granddaughter, Tamara Moore, shares the story of the man they called "Uncle Jim." He was buried in Section 15 of Arlington National Cemetery. (Courtesy of Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial)

From Former Slaves To Writers, Civilians, Too, Rest At Arlington

JAMES PARKS | was born a Slave, in the year of 1843, on the Arlington estate. The military burial ground was created on land that was once the home of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. When the estate became Arlington National Cemetery, he stayed on as a freed man and dug graves. His great-granddaughter, Tamara Moore, shares the story of the man they called "Uncle Jim." He was buried in Section 15 of Arlington National Cemetery. (Courtesy of Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial)

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