In 1862, Mary Jane Patterson became the first African-American woman to receive a BA degree when she graduated from Oberlin College #womenshistory #BlackHistoryMonth

In 1862, Mary Jane Patterson became the first African-American woman to receive a BA degree when she graduated from Oberlin College #womenshistory #BlackHistoryMonth

Toni "Tomboy" Stone made history in 1953 when she joined the Negro Leagues, making her the first woman ever to play professionally in a men's league.

Toni "Tomboy" Stone made history in 1953 when she joined the Negro Leagues, making her the first woman ever to play professionally in a men's league.

Jayne Kennedy was the the first woman to join the staff of CBS Sports’ “NFL Today” and the first black Miss Ohio. She is seen here wearing a robust curly hairstyle.

Jayne Kennedy was the the first woman to join the staff of CBS Sports’ “NFL Today” and the first black Miss Ohio. She is seen here wearing a robust curly hairstyle.

In 1911, Florence Elizabeth Higginbotham came to Nantucket as a domestic. In 1920, Mrs. Higginbotham bought her own Nantucket home where she lived for the rest of her life. In 1933, Mrs. Higginbotham purchased the African Meeting House, a structure that served as a church, school and meeting house for the African American community. After Mrs. Higginbotham died in 1972, her son, Wilhelm, honored her request to retain the meeting house property.

In 1911, Florence Elizabeth Higginbotham came to Nantucket as a domestic. In 1920, Mrs. Higginbotham bought her own Nantucket home where she lived for the rest of her life. In 1933, Mrs. Higginbotham purchased the African Meeting House, a structure that served as a church, school and meeting house for the African American community. After Mrs. Higginbotham died in 1972, her son, Wilhelm, honored her request to retain the meeting house property.

Dr. Pauli Murray was the first African American woman to be ordained as an Episcopal priest. She was also a civil rights and women's rights activist, lawyer, and author.

Dr. Pauli Murray was the first African American woman to be ordained as an Episcopal priest. She was also a civil rights and women's rights activist, lawyer, and author.

Thelma Porter, Miss Subways New York City, 1948. Thelma was the first woman to integrate a beauty contest in America and became the first African American Miss Subways in April, 1948.

Thelma Porter, Miss Subways New York City, 1948. Thelma was the first woman to integrate a beauty contest in America and became the first African American Miss Subways in April, 1948.

Clara "Mother" Hale, who at age 67 became founder of Hale House, a home for unwanted children, and children born addicted to drugs. By 1991, a reported 1,000+ children had been cared for by Hale House. At the time of her death in 1992 at the age of 87, Mother Hale had received over 372 awards, President Reagan had referred to her as an “American Hero” in his State of the Union address, and she was named an honorary member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.

Clara "Mother" Hale, who at age 67 became founder of Hale House, a home for unwanted children, and children born addicted to drugs. By 1991, a reported 1,000+ children had been cared for by Hale House. At the time of her death in 1992 at the age of 87, Mother Hale had received over 372 awards, President Reagan had referred to her as an “American Hero” in his State of the Union address, and she was named an honorary member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.

(Though she was born in the Carribbean, we should all know the history of Mary Seacole. Thus she is included in this set of images.) Mary Seacole -After the outbreak of the Crimean War in 1853, Seacole traveled overseas to the British War Office, determined to serve as an army nurse. Then when she was refused, she funded her own trip to Crimea, started a hotel for injured officers (built out of salvaged materials), and braved enemy fire to nurse the wounded on the battlefield.

(Though she was born in the Carribbean, we should all know the history of Mary Seacole. Thus she is included in this set of images.) Mary Seacole -After the outbreak of the Crimean War in 1853, Seacole traveled overseas to the British War Office, determined to serve as an army nurse. Then when she was refused, she funded her own trip to Crimea, started a hotel for injured officers (built out of salvaged materials), and braved enemy fire to nurse the wounded on the battlefield.

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