Burnéd Shoés

Burnéd Shoés

from A to B and Back Again / Around the world, through space and time... a photographic exploration into the known and unknown. "My favourite nation: imagination." (Burnéd Shoés)
Burnéd Shoés
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Unknown photographer, ca. 1930, untitled“I looked silently at her lips. All women are lips, nothing but lips. Some are pink, supple, round-a right, a tender shield against the whole world. And then these: A second ago they didn’t exist, and now suddenly, made by a knife, the sweet blood still dripping.” ― Yevgeny Zamyatin

Unknown photographer, ca. 1930, untitled“I looked silently at her lips. All women are lips, nothing but lips. Some are pink, supple, round-a right, a tender shield against the whole world. And then these: A second ago they didn’t exist, and now suddenly, made by a knife, the sweet blood still dripping.” ― Yevgeny Zamyatin

© Lee Miller, 1945, SS Guard in Canal, Dachau, GermanyLee Miller (1907-1977) is considered one of the most fascinating artists of the 20th century. In only 16 years, she produced a body of photographic work of a range that remains unparalleled, and that unites the most divergent genres. Miller’s oeuvre extends from surrealistic images to photography in the fields of fashion, travelling, portraiture and even war correspondence; the Albertina presents a survey of the work in its breadth and…

"SS Guard in Canal, near Dachau Concentration Camp" Photo: Lee Miller - Germany - Upper Bavaria, Dachau, 1945

© Robert Capa (aka Endre Ernö Friedmann), 1941, Atlantic OceanA crewman of a Cunard freighter signals another ship of an Allied convoy  en route to Great Britain from the U.S. Their ship is carrying seven  airplanes, two torpedo boats, and twelve passengers who agreed to travel  at their own risk. The captain and his crew are Norwegian and have  crossed the Atlantic many times during the war.» find more of Magnum Photos here «I’m back again, I missed you guys!What have I missed in the last…

Robert Capa, A crewman signals another ship of an Allied convoy across the Atlantic from the U. to England, © Robert Capa—International Center of Photography/Magnum Photos

© Gottscho-Schleisner, Oct. 27, 1948, Office with secretary, Russel Wright, 221 E. 48th St., NYC)

"The bourgeois prefers comfort to pleasure, convenience to liberty, and a pleasant temperature to the deathly inner consuming fire.

© Thomas Child, ca. 1870s, Jade Belt Bridge, BeijingThis is an early photograph of Jade Belt Bridge, or Moon Bridge, located on the grounds of the Summer Palace in Beijing on the western shore of Kunming Lake. The elegant high arch bridge is a traditional Chinese design. The arch was constructed high enough to allow passage of the Emperor’s dragon boat. On special occasions the Emperor and Empress travelled on Kunming Lake passing under this bridge.Find more photos from the 1870s here.

© Thomas Child, ca. Jade Belt Bridge, Beijing This is an early photograph of Jade Belt Bridge, or Moon Bridge, located on the grounds of the Summer Palace in Beijing on the western shore of.

© Erich Lessing, 1952, The clown Frank Billerbeck (later known as Billy Beck), Café Le Select, Boulevard Montparnasse, ParisClowns with guns…» find more of Magnum Photos here «

© Erich Lessing, The clown Frank Billerbeck (later known as Billy Beck), Café Le Select, Boulevard Montparnasse, Paris Clowns with guns…

© Tony Frank, 1965, Bob Dylan (video shoot for ‘Subterranean Homesick Blues’), LondonShot in a nondescript alley behind the Savoy Hotel in London, the video for Bob Dylan’s “Subterranean Homesick Blues” served as the opening segment for Don’t Look Back, D. A. Pennebaker’s 1967 documentary of Dylan’s first tour through England in 1965.Shot with a nod to the cinéma vérité style of the film, the famous clip shows Dylan hoisting more-or-less corresponding cue cards to his politicized lyric...

© Tony Frank, Bob Dylan (video shoot for ‘Subterranean Homesick Blues’), London Shot in a nondescript alley behind the Savoy Hotel in London, the video for Bob Dylan’s “Subterranean Homesick Blues” served as the opening segment for Don’t Look.