Lucy Craft Laney (April 13, 1854 – October 24, 1933) was an early African American educator who was the first to establish a school for African American children in Augusta, Georgia.  She was born in Macon, Georgia, to former slaves.  Although it was illegal for blacks to read at the time of her birth, she was taught by a slave owner's sister, and by 1869 she was enrolled in Atlanta University.  Enrollment in her first school in Macon was only 6; by 1928 it had grown to over 800 students.

Lucy Craft Laney (April 13, 1854 – October 24, 1933) was an early African American educator who was the first to establish a school for African American children in Augusta, Georgia. She was born in Macon, Georgia, to former slaves. Although it was illegal for blacks to read at the time of her birth, she was taught by a slave owner's sister, and by 1869 she was enrolled in Atlanta University. Enrollment in her first school in Macon was only 6; by 1928 it had grown to over 800 students.

Mayor William B. Hartsfield inspecting Buttermilk Bottom, an Atlanta slum.  This neighborhood stood where the Atlanta Civic Center now stands, around 395 Piedmont Avenue NE.  LIFE magazine, 1959.  Photographer:  Grey Villet. via Atlanta Time Machine.

Mayor William B. Hartsfield inspecting Buttermilk Bottom, an Atlanta slum. This neighborhood stood where the Atlanta Civic Center now stands, around 395 Piedmont Avenue NE. LIFE magazine, 1959. Photographer: Grey Villet. via Atlanta Time Machine.

1955: View of the exterior of the Peachtree Arcade entrance on Broad Street in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. The Arcade was demolished in 1964.

1955: View of the exterior of the Peachtree Arcade entrance on Broad Street in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. The Arcade was demolished in 1964.

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