Osmia Avosetta are solitary bees that build their nests by biting petals off of flowers, flying them back one by one, and gluing them together often using nectar as glue. Each nest is a papermache work of art that houses a single bee egg.

Osmia Avosetta are solitary bees that build their nests by biting petals off of flowers, flying them back one by one, and gluing them together often using nectar as glue. Each nest is a papermache work of art that houses a single bee egg.

Conditions -Allergic Rhinitis -Allergic Conjunctivitis -Sinusitis -Ocular Eye Allergies -Sinus Headache -Asthma -Skin Allergies -Food Allergies -Drug Allergies -Insect Sting Allergies -Latex Allergies -Recurrent Infections -Anaphylaxes

1 | The Wondrous Beauty Of Microscopic Plant Seeds | Co.Design: business + innovation + design

The Wondrous Beauty Of Microscopic Plant Seeds

1 | The Wondrous Beauty Of Microscopic Plant Seeds | Co.Design: business + innovation + design

Pollen grains. Coloured scanning electron micrographs (SEM) of pollen grains from a variety of plants. Including: sunflower (Helianthus annuus), morning glory (Ipomea purpurea), hollyhock (Sildalcea malviflora), lily (Lilium auratum), primrose (Oenothera fruticosa), and caster bean (Ricinus communis). Credit: AMI IMAGES/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Pollen grains. Coloured scanning electron micrographs (SEM) of pollen grains from a variety of plants. Including: sunflower (Helianthus annuus), morning glory (Ipomea purpurea), hollyhock (Sildalcea malviflora), lily (Lilium auratum), primrose (Oenothera fruticosa), and caster bean (Ricinus communis). Credit: AMI IMAGES/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

honeycomb - if bees were wiped off the earth, humans would have less than four years left to live because bees pollinate most of our food supply.

honeycomb - if bees were wiped off the earth, humans would have less than four years left to live because bees pollinate most of our food supply.

A Swiss scientists named Martin Oeggerli uses a Scanning Electron Microscope in his cellar to capture images of pollen grains.

A Swiss scientists named Martin Oeggerli uses a Scanning Electron Microscope in his cellar to capture images of pollen grains.

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